2008.09.10 Should it stay or should it go?

Written by David Green.

Should it stay or should it go? That is the question


By RICH FOLEY

I suppose I should be better organized when it comes to the flood of paper I always seem to be facing, but sometimes, it’s just so easy to put things off until later. “Later,” it seems, can often turn out to be “much, much later.”

 For example, a fund raising letter sent to me by Barack Obama in May, 2006, just resurfaced from under a pile of slightly newer “keepsakes.” It came to the Observer address so I wondered at the time if I had written a column that made someone think I was a prospect for a donation to the “Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.”

Whatever the reasoning that got me that letter, I never received another and so far, Obama hasn’t hit me up for a donation for 2008. Maybe he’s too busy, or just afraid I’d write about him. Either way, should I dispose of such a historic document?

That line of thinking helps to explain the box I was digging into last week. Since the newest thing in it dates from 2004, I’m guessing I threw a bunch of stuff into a box rather than sort through it when I was packing to move to Fayette. I’m just glad I didn’t need anything from the box any sooner. Which reminds me of the key story...

Shortly before I moved, I signed a rental agreement with Gene Beaverson and he gave me a pair of keys to my new apartment. I put one on my keychain and the other in what I thought was a safe place during the move. When I had need of the extra key some time later, it was not where I thought I had left it, nor anywhere else I looked. About a year and a half later, it turned up unexpectedly in another box of various “stuff.”

So imagine my excitement at this box of souvenirs of my time as a Michiganiac. Near the top was a 2004 Oldsmobile brochure, a little reminder of the brand’s last year. Then things started to get interesting.

There was my Kindergarten Certificate, entitling me to enter first grade the next school year. It was signed by principal DeRand Jones. I’ve never met anyone else in my life named DeRand.

Then there was a photo of my kindergarten class. I’d bet most schools don’t have over 30 kids in one class these days. I still can’t identify nearly half of them.

A stack of old postcards was pretty interesting, too. There were quite a few old airline postcards, which I collected when I was much younger. I doubt any airlines are handing them out free these days. One, from American Airlines, pictured their 365 mph DC7 airliner. That must be the oldest in my collection. I also had postcards from Allegheny and Mohawk Airlines, two long-gone carriers. I’ll be hanging on to these.

I also have postcards from the Irish Hills Twin Towers, the shoreline of Foley, Alabama (no relation that I’m aware of), and the U.S. Royal Tire/Ferris wheel from the 1964 New York World’s Fair, which later rolled to Michigan and became the giant tire along the freeway near Detroit. I’m keeping those, too.

Then there’s one of the water filtration plant in Iron Mountain, Michigan. Maybe I don’t have to keep every single postcard after all.

Next, a photograph from 1981 of me with NASCAR driver Jody Ridley. Ridley had recently won his first (and only, as it turned out) Cup race and was posing in the MIS garage for anyone who wanted a picture. That’s Jody in the firesuit, me in the cowboy hat. Like to see it? Over my dead body.

The most fascinating find was the check register from my first checking account. I opened it in 1974 and it took until 1982 to use the first hundred checks. I started writing a lot more checks after I got my first apartment.

What memories some of the entries brought back. For example, back in 1979 I bought a brand new Ford Mustang and my payments were a whopping $122.93 per month. I wonder what kind of vehicle I could get for that kind of money today?

And the prices I paid after I got my apartment in 1983 were a lot lower than I’m used to now. Rent was $255 per month, including utilities. Cable television service was $9. And my phone bill ran between $11 and $12 per month at first. By April, 1987, it still was only $14.21. I must not have known anyone out of town to call in those days. 

No wonder I have so many boxes. How could I part with such history? Except for that photo of me and Jody Ridley. It’s as good as gone.

  • Front.splash
    Water Fun—Carter Seitz and Colson Walter take a fast trip along a plastic sliding strip while water from a sprinkler provides the lubrication. The boys took a break from tie-dyeing last week at Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program to cool off in the water.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Girls.on.ride
    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
  • Front.softball
    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016