2008.06.04 Political season drones on

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

Tired of all the political talk whenever you open a newspaper, turn on the radio or try to watch television? Would it cheer you up to realize there are five more months of it to come? Yes, this has to be the longest campaign in history and there’s way too much more left. No amount of complaining will shorten it, so we might as well make of it what we can.

Locally, I have to say I’m finding quite a bit of entertainment in the race for Lenawee County Sheriff. Eight candidates have filed for the office and all of them seem to have some type of experience that would serve them well in the office. It might be tough to pick a candidate solely on experience and qualifications, so getting out and meeting the voters on a personal level becomes even more important to the candidates.

Never has there been so many candidates for the office, and as a group, they could be considered the best and brightest in local law enforcement. That raises the question, who’s watching out for the bad guys while eight of the county’s finest are out campaigning? Even current sheriff Richardson is running for another post so we can’t expect him to do it all, either.  Seriously, I’m sure all of the candidates will be doing their campaigning on their own time. Still, it might be a bit safer to live in Ohio until after the election.

On the national scene, the campaign for president seems to have lasted forever and one party still is waiting for the last of the losing candidates to give up. I’m sure to upset some supporters of Hilary Clinton, but I can’t believe her nerve in continuing to demand she be awarded the delegate votes from Michigan and Florida.

The Democratic Party was quite clear in letting the states know well ahead of time that moving the dates of their primaries ahead would cause their delegates not to be seated. Candidates were asked to remove their names from the rogue states’ ballots and in Michigan, all major candidates except Senator Clinton complied.

Now, she demands that the delegates be seated, saying that doing otherwise would disenfranchise the voters, voters who had a choice only of voting for Hilary or no one. Going through with an outlaw primary with only one major candidate on the ballot was the real disenfranchisement.

It’s kind of like a bank robber saying he should be allowed to keep the money because to give it back would take away the money’s right to be stolen. Last weekend, the rogue delegates were granted the right to be seated, although with one half vote each. Ms. Clinton doesn’t seem to consider this enough, retaining her right to protest this present from her party. You just can’t satisfy some people. And the campaign goes on.

 By the time you read this, we should know the winner of the Montana primary, probably the first time in history anyone cared, even in Missoula. At least it will be fun to watch the network journalists reporting from places like Butte, Helena, and Kallispell. South Dakota voted yesterday as well. I hope you didn’t lose any sleep waiting for the exit polls from Mitchell, Sioux Falls and Rapid City.

Sometimes I wonder what the reporting would have been like if television existed in the 1800s. In 1881, President Garfield was shot and lived nearly three months before passing away. At first, doctors said his wounds were not life threatening. But a succession of physicians probing his body in an attempt to remove the bullet resulted in an infection and Garfield eventually died, more due to their meddling than to the initial shooting.

Just think what television coverage of that story would have been like as Garfield’s condition improved, then worsened. And it happened during the summer, so there would have been something to watch other than reruns. Then there was the trial after his death.

Charles Guiteau, charged with Garfield’s assassination, tried the novel defense tactic of pointing out that Garfield was initially expected to live. Guiteau claimed that he merely shot Garfield, it was an act of God and the doctors who killed him. These days, that might have worked, but the courts of the day convicted and executed him. And yes, John McCain may be old, but he wasn’t on the Guiteau jury.

  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
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    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
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    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
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    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
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    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
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    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
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    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
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    BEVY OF BALLS—Stair District Library Summer Reading Program VolunTeens, including Libby Rorick, back left and Ty Kruse, back right, threw a dozen inflatable soccer balls into the crowd during a reading of “Sergio Saves the Game.” The sports-themed program continues on Wednesdays through July 27.
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