The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

2008.01.03 The Factoid File

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

The new year has barely started, but it’s already time for more stuff, fresh from the land of useless information....

The average amount of loose change contained in automobiles going through the auto crusher at the end of their useful life? $1.65, according to one of the country’s biggest auto recyclers. Better check under the seats the next time you trade one in.

In Italy, Parmesan cheese is the item stolen in one out of ten shop-liftings. Insert your own joke here.

The U.S. government owns about 85 percent of the state of Nevada. Add in Las Vegas, Reno and Carson City and there’s not much left over for anyone else.

Not too many of the old patent medicines survived passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, but Dr. Mile’s Compound Extract of Tomato can still be found today...only now we call it ketchup.

A Chinese anti-satellite weapons test early in 2007 added about 25 percent to the total of man-made space debris orbiting Earth. There are now roughly 12,000 traceable objects baseball size or bigger, plus more than 100,000 lesser-sized pieces. The smaller pieces are large enough to damage a spacecraft, but not big enough to track from Earth. Makes you want to be an astronaut, doesn’t it? The oldest man-made object in space is the old Vanguard I satellite, sent up by the U.S. in 1958. Does it receive mailings from the AARP, too?

Over 16 million gallons of motor oil leak from the nation’s vehicles each year. My old Chevy Caprice was responsible for a few gallons a year all by itself.

What is Mickey Dolenz, most famous for being drummer for The Monkees, up to these days? Amazingly, he’s the commercial voice of Snuggle, the fabric softener bear. On second thought, that’s actually quite appropriate, having a washed-up rock star helping to sell fabric softener.

Over three million people have their names legally changed each year. I wonder what the most popular new name is?

McDonald’s sells about 17 Big Macs every second in the United States alone. Not all of them to the person in front of you in line, even though it may seem like it.

Tim Brady, an employee of an English rental car company, borrowed a Porsche from inventory and was clocked driving it at 172 mph, the highest speed ever recorded on police radar. That feat also made him an ex-employee and cost him 10 weeks of jail time.

Sales of blank audio cassettes, which reached a peak of 442 million in 1990, have fallen steadily since to a mere 700,000 last year. Biggest users now are police and court stenographers. I still have some from before 1990 I’ve never used.

The late Merv Griffin, who developed the television show “Jeopardy,” also wrote the music played while contestants write their answers in the final round. His royalties from that 30 seconds of time filler reportedly earned him $70 million in royalties. Next time a stupid melody comes to you, better write it down.

Abraham Lincoln had never met Hannibal Hamlin, vice president during his first term, until well after their election in 1860. They corresponded by letter after Hamlin was given the second spot on the ticket, but their paths had never crossed prior to the election, even though Hamlin was a senator during Lincoln’s two-year term in Congress in the 1850s.

A gentleman named Bill Bunyan accomplished the unusual feat of eating a hamburger in every county of his home state of Kansas. But did he have fries with them?

Pound for pound, the ant population of the world outweighs the human population. And I’ve never even seen an obese ant.

The Dunlop Tire company has for the past few years offered a free set of tires to anyone willing to get the brand’s logo tattooed on their body. Over the first three years of the program, the company has paid off to 98 people.

Famous people of the past with tattoos include both Thomas Edison and Josef Stalin. I’m not sure any other similarities between those two exist.

Of all homes in the United States valued at over $1 million dollars, a whopping 41 percent are located in just one state—California. What, you were expecting me to say North Dakota?

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