2005.11.30 X marks the cah-cah

Written by David Green.

By JEFF PICKELL

For a while, I considered becoming a teacher because I love marking things wrong. There are few things I enjoy more than marring neat, legible handwriting with a sloppy X, or an even more thoughtless slash.

I relished my time as a teacher’s aide in high school, especially checking the papers of people I didn’t like. I relished the thought that, with each one of those sloppy X’s, I was sending that person one step further down the road to a job centered around the handling of smelly things.

I realized, though, that my zest for marking things wrong could hardly be compared with my feelings toward high schoolers, who rank a dash above middle schoolers, who rank a dash above having a bag of soggy garbage poured on my head on the list of things I can’t tolerate.

Nope, when considering an occupation, I definitely had to take into account my general hatred toward sprightly youths and the like. I also had to take into account my general hatred toward people, objects beginning with the letter M, and the entire emotional spectrum starting at “so-so” and building in happiness to “euphoric.”

Imagine why I was so taken by the ad for this position, which read “WANTED: Youthful, disenfranchised, disillusioned male/female who tends to see the glass half empty. Propensity for spending long, cold nights alone and brooding in the dark preferable. Job includes talking to people, mostly over the phone, long, miserable Mondays, and daily excursions to Ohio. Good writing skills a must. Some copy editing required.”

Copy editing, eh? Why that’s kind of like marking things wrong, isn’t it? And hey, anybody can fake being a good writer. All you have to do is use intelligent sounding words like “regard,” “pursuit” and “rumbustious” and connectors like “if,” “with,” “Smith,” and “hunky dory.” Most importantly, the job would give me plenty of time to hate everything except the things I don’t hate. In that regard, my pursuit of the position was was swift and rumbustious, if, by hunky dory, Smith...uh...with.

In fact, I’m so good at faking being a good writer that the University of Michigan gave me a degree with high distinction and honors in English. Heck, for a while, I even thought something along the lines of, “I’m going to be the best #$%& writer these folks have ever seen.”

Then I moved to Morenci and met Colleen Leddy, the only person in the world who likes marking things wrong more than me. To say there was “some” red ink on my first feature would be an understatement. In fact, as far as I could tell, Colleen must’ve abandoned the red pen altogether, because the only way that much red could’ve gotten onto the paper is if she took into the backyard and riddled it with paint balls.  

Now, to be fair, Colleen doesn’t mark things “wrong” per se; she offers constructive criticisms, as do David and Kim and Rich and everyone else who proofreads. But Colleen is probably the most diligent finder of errors I have ever met, and this means a lot coming from a person who spends most of his time pointing out imperfections in people, places, things and ideas (i.e. myself, Canada, toothpaste and love, respectively).

Her diligence isn’t a bad thing in this business, not when it’s the truth that counts. And I’m telling you kids, right now, that the truth is a hard thing to come by, and that you’ll never know the truth about yourself, especially as a writer, until you’ve been ruthlessly Leddy-fied.

You may think you’re verbose and precise and invincible now, but wait until a mild-mannered librarian mother of three writes “poo poo cah cah” next to one of your wordy sentences. Wait until you re-read it and say aloud, “Wow, that sentence really does stink.”

Wait until you look to the top of your own column and think, “Now who’s handling the smelly things?”

   - Nov. 30, 2005

 

  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
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  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

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