The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Gardener's Grapevine 2013.04.24

Written by David Green.

It has been my experience that most gardeners also have at least one pet of some kind. If you’ve read along with this column since I started writing it, you would recognize our lab, Kisses.

This was no ordinary dog. She was a gardening buddy. She would go to the church with me to work in the Sunday school room, work on the landscaping or set up for the bazaar. She went to the recycling center to harass Laurie. She followed anyone who walked by our house to see if they needed company, and more than once someone would come up to me as I worked and ask if this dog was ours. Yes, she was ours, but also anyone who came to visits.

She would dig holes if I dug one to plant something and she picked her own tomatoes and ears of corn. She talked like Scooby Doo. If you asked her where she wanted to go she’d say “I wront row” (I don’t know) and make everyone laugh. She loved everyone she met and it didn’t matter if they were friend or not.

This past Thursday Kisses became incredibly ill and passed. I not only lost my garden buddy, I lost a fabulous friend. It is amazing how close an animal can get to you and how incredibly smart they can be. Who would guess that a dog would like tomatoes, or apples and pears straight from the tree? That an animal would learn to pick their own.

If you have never had a pet for a companion, it is time to find out what it's like. They give so much more than they take; no one will love you or follow you with such devotion.

I have had many garden buddies from a Flemish Giant rabbit that weighed around 20 pounds named Buddy, to our dogs and even the outside cats.

An animal makes life so much more interesting. They also do some of the craziest things you could ever imagine, like digging up what you just planted or eating a large amount of your harvest. Kisses was one in a million and we will miss her dearly and part of her is still everywhere we look.

​On that note, I got a very decent start in the garden this week. Wednesday I planted three shrub rosebushes that can get up to 12 feet tall. I also did a little raspberry pruning and my silly lab stuck her face in them and looked at me like ouch you could have told me those bite. I had to laugh. Who knew she’d want to see what I was doing that closely. Art and I cleaned up the strawberry bed and transplanted strawberry plants. We also planted a lot of onions in with the strawberry beds as they are companion plants. I had two onions from the house that were growing so they were popped in along with the sets we purchased. I also moved some onions from the flower bed out front. Not sure how they got there but I get a lot of plants  that I didn’t put in. I just consider them bonus plants.

Every day I take a trip around the gardens and check out the changes that seem to occur overnight. Spring is my favorite season because it’s so awesome to see everything come back from a long sleep. By the way, the darn peas still aren’t in...maybe tomorrow. Hey, cut me some slack. I had to say goodbye to my best gardening friend. Sleep well my Kisses until we meet again.

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