Gardener's Grapevine 2013.04.24

Written by David Green.

It has been my experience that most gardeners also have at least one pet of some kind. If you’ve read along with this column since I started writing it, you would recognize our lab, Kisses.

This was no ordinary dog. She was a gardening buddy. She would go to the church with me to work in the Sunday school room, work on the landscaping or set up for the bazaar. She went to the recycling center to harass Laurie. She followed anyone who walked by our house to see if they needed company, and more than once someone would come up to me as I worked and ask if this dog was ours. Yes, she was ours, but also anyone who came to visits.

She would dig holes if I dug one to plant something and she picked her own tomatoes and ears of corn. She talked like Scooby Doo. If you asked her where she wanted to go she’d say “I wront row” (I don’t know) and make everyone laugh. She loved everyone she met and it didn’t matter if they were friend or not.

This past Thursday Kisses became incredibly ill and passed. I not only lost my garden buddy, I lost a fabulous friend. It is amazing how close an animal can get to you and how incredibly smart they can be. Who would guess that a dog would like tomatoes, or apples and pears straight from the tree? That an animal would learn to pick their own.

If you have never had a pet for a companion, it is time to find out what it's like. They give so much more than they take; no one will love you or follow you with such devotion.

I have had many garden buddies from a Flemish Giant rabbit that weighed around 20 pounds named Buddy, to our dogs and even the outside cats.

An animal makes life so much more interesting. They also do some of the craziest things you could ever imagine, like digging up what you just planted or eating a large amount of your harvest. Kisses was one in a million and we will miss her dearly and part of her is still everywhere we look.

​On that note, I got a very decent start in the garden this week. Wednesday I planted three shrub rosebushes that can get up to 12 feet tall. I also did a little raspberry pruning and my silly lab stuck her face in them and looked at me like ouch you could have told me those bite. I had to laugh. Who knew she’d want to see what I was doing that closely. Art and I cleaned up the strawberry bed and transplanted strawberry plants. We also planted a lot of onions in with the strawberry beds as they are companion plants. I had two onions from the house that were growing so they were popped in along with the sets we purchased. I also moved some onions from the flower bed out front. Not sure how they got there but I get a lot of plants  that I didn’t put in. I just consider them bonus plants.

Every day I take a trip around the gardens and check out the changes that seem to occur overnight. Spring is my favorite season because it’s so awesome to see everything come back from a long sleep. By the way, the darn peas still aren’t in...maybe tomorrow. Hey, cut me some slack. I had to say goodbye to my best gardening friend. Sleep well my Kisses until we meet again.

  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016