Gardener's Grapevine 2013.04.24

Written by David Green.

It has been my experience that most gardeners also have at least one pet of some kind. If you’ve read along with this column since I started writing it, you would recognize our lab, Kisses.

This was no ordinary dog. She was a gardening buddy. She would go to the church with me to work in the Sunday school room, work on the landscaping or set up for the bazaar. She went to the recycling center to harass Laurie. She followed anyone who walked by our house to see if they needed company, and more than once someone would come up to me as I worked and ask if this dog was ours. Yes, she was ours, but also anyone who came to visits.

She would dig holes if I dug one to plant something and she picked her own tomatoes and ears of corn. She talked like Scooby Doo. If you asked her where she wanted to go she’d say “I wront row” (I don’t know) and make everyone laugh. She loved everyone she met and it didn’t matter if they were friend or not.

This past Thursday Kisses became incredibly ill and passed. I not only lost my garden buddy, I lost a fabulous friend. It is amazing how close an animal can get to you and how incredibly smart they can be. Who would guess that a dog would like tomatoes, or apples and pears straight from the tree? That an animal would learn to pick their own.

If you have never had a pet for a companion, it is time to find out what it's like. They give so much more than they take; no one will love you or follow you with such devotion.

I have had many garden buddies from a Flemish Giant rabbit that weighed around 20 pounds named Buddy, to our dogs and even the outside cats.

An animal makes life so much more interesting. They also do some of the craziest things you could ever imagine, like digging up what you just planted or eating a large amount of your harvest. Kisses was one in a million and we will miss her dearly and part of her is still everywhere we look.

​On that note, I got a very decent start in the garden this week. Wednesday I planted three shrub rosebushes that can get up to 12 feet tall. I also did a little raspberry pruning and my silly lab stuck her face in them and looked at me like ouch you could have told me those bite. I had to laugh. Who knew she’d want to see what I was doing that closely. Art and I cleaned up the strawberry bed and transplanted strawberry plants. We also planted a lot of onions in with the strawberry beds as they are companion plants. I had two onions from the house that were growing so they were popped in along with the sets we purchased. I also moved some onions from the flower bed out front. Not sure how they got there but I get a lot of plants  that I didn’t put in. I just consider them bonus plants.

Every day I take a trip around the gardens and check out the changes that seem to occur overnight. Spring is my favorite season because it’s so awesome to see everything come back from a long sleep. By the way, the darn peas still aren’t in...maybe tomorrow. Hey, cut me some slack. I had to say goodbye to my best gardening friend. Sleep well my Kisses until we meet again.

  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.grieders
    ONE-TWO PUNCH—Morenci’s Griffin Grieder saved his best for last, running his fastest time ever in the 110-meter high hurdles at the state finals Saturday in Grand Rapids to finish first in the state in Div. IV. His brother Luke, a junior (right), claimed the state runner-up spot. Bulldog junior Bailee Dominique placed seventh in the 100-meter dash.
  • Front.sidewalk
    MORENCI senior class president Mikayla Price leads the way Sunday afternoon from the Church of the Nazarene to the United Methodist Church for the baccalaureate ceremony. Later in the day, 39 members of the senior class received diplomas in the high school gymnasium.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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