Gardener's Grapevine 2013.04.10

Written by David Green.

I’ve had spring fever very bad for the last week, and today is such a teaser. It’s such a beautiful Sunday afternoon, even the dog doesn’t want to be inside.

As I look the garden situation over I am once again amazed at how well everything survived this past winter. I didn’t lose a single rosebush, which is amazing as at least one usually says it’s had enough.

As I sit writing this, I am contemplating planting the peas this afternoon and wonder what else would be able to get going. I Googled cool weather planting and came up with quite a lot that can be planted right now. We would have to have a very long cold snap for any harm to come to items planted now. Peas were at the top of the list of cool weather veggies to start. Radishes love cooler temps and if planted now will allow for more than one harvest this summer. Broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage should be planted when the temps stay above 50.

Lettuce, spinach, collards and kale are all cool weather plants and tend to lose quality in overly hot weather. Plant onion sets as soon as the soil is thawed in the spring. Carrots can be sown early in the spring along with potatoes, if the ground can be worked up. The potatoes will grow and yield a larger crop if given the advantage of going in early. Beets and swiss chard are both hearty enough to start at early spring thaw. Reading all this just makes me want to go  play in the dirt.

Last fall I wrote about assessing your gardens and jotting down in your garden journal what needs split or moved. If hostas are on that list, see if the nubs are starting to stick out of the ground. I bet they are, as mine are. Once they start poking through, it is an ideal time to split them. Remember that the nubs sticking up are always going to show in the center first so start spading quite a ways away from your showing nubs. The outer leaves form last and you will have quite an odd looking plant if you only take up the center.

Once the entire plant is out of the ground, lay it aside and spade down the center to split it. If it’s a large plant, cut the halves in as many sections as you want. Remember that a hosta will round itself out no matter what it looks like when you plant it.

Once split, put the sections in the ground wherever you want them and water well. If there is more than what you want or need, plop it in a pot with soil, water it well, and give it away.

One advantage we have of living on Main Street is that I can put plants out by the road with a little identification stick and they will disappear quicker than pancakes when the kids come home. I love to share with others and it makes an easy way to share my love of gardening.

  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.snake
    Lannis Smith of the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor shows off a python last week at Stair District Library's Summer Reading Program.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.rock Study
    ROCKHOUNDS—From the left, Joseph McCullough, Sean Pagett and Jonathan McCullough peer through hand lenses to study rocks. The project is part of Morenci Elementary School’s summer camp that continues into August.

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