Gardener's Grapevine 2013.04.10

Written by David Green.

I’ve had spring fever very bad for the last week, and today is such a teaser. It’s such a beautiful Sunday afternoon, even the dog doesn’t want to be inside.

As I look the garden situation over I am once again amazed at how well everything survived this past winter. I didn’t lose a single rosebush, which is amazing as at least one usually says it’s had enough.

As I sit writing this, I am contemplating planting the peas this afternoon and wonder what else would be able to get going. I Googled cool weather planting and came up with quite a lot that can be planted right now. We would have to have a very long cold snap for any harm to come to items planted now. Peas were at the top of the list of cool weather veggies to start. Radishes love cooler temps and if planted now will allow for more than one harvest this summer. Broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage should be planted when the temps stay above 50.

Lettuce, spinach, collards and kale are all cool weather plants and tend to lose quality in overly hot weather. Plant onion sets as soon as the soil is thawed in the spring. Carrots can be sown early in the spring along with potatoes, if the ground can be worked up. The potatoes will grow and yield a larger crop if given the advantage of going in early. Beets and swiss chard are both hearty enough to start at early spring thaw. Reading all this just makes me want to go  play in the dirt.

Last fall I wrote about assessing your gardens and jotting down in your garden journal what needs split or moved. If hostas are on that list, see if the nubs are starting to stick out of the ground. I bet they are, as mine are. Once they start poking through, it is an ideal time to split them. Remember that the nubs sticking up are always going to show in the center first so start spading quite a ways away from your showing nubs. The outer leaves form last and you will have quite an odd looking plant if you only take up the center.

Once the entire plant is out of the ground, lay it aside and spade down the center to split it. If it’s a large plant, cut the halves in as many sections as you want. Remember that a hosta will round itself out no matter what it looks like when you plant it.

Once split, put the sections in the ground wherever you want them and water well. If there is more than what you want or need, plop it in a pot with soil, water it well, and give it away.

One advantage we have of living on Main Street is that I can put plants out by the road with a little identification stick and they will disappear quicker than pancakes when the kids come home. I love to share with others and it makes an easy way to share my love of gardening.

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    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
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