Gardener's Grapevine 2013.03.27

Written by David Green.

Well, here we are again, Sunday afternoon. I’m lounging on the couch writing this and watching Red Neck Comedy tour, the Movie. First of all I didn’t know they made a movie; second, I’m sitting here thinking: if you might be a redneck if you mow your lawn and find a car, would you plant flowers?

I don’t know anyone with a lawn that could hide a car, but if I did why would they plant flowers or a garden if they don’t care about the yard? I’m pretty sure appearances are not going to be a priority, and a flower is not going to survive in a forest of grass anyway.

A few weeks ago I wrote about lawn décor from found or repurposed items. I did not mean refrigerators, cars or living room furniture. Today I saw a yard with a lot of old farm items for décor and it was very nicely done. They had a wagon wheel on each side of the drive and old hand-driven plows with landscaping around them in the yard. It was beautiful as they had a large lot so it did not overwhelm.

I was reading a magazine this week that was talking about unusual items to use for plant containers and they used old galvanized tubs and watering cans that weren’t able to hold water anymore without leakage. It said that if you place it in a garden it won’t matter if water leaks out because the ground will soak it up and it will have great drainage. I thought, what if you wanted it on a deck or porch? Then I thought why not do like I do the hanging baskets and line it with plastic bags that are under the lip so no one sees them: no leakage but all the old look style. If you do this you absolutely have to put some rock or such in the bottom to let the water escape the roots. Plants do not like wet feet.

I also read a new idea to keep invasive plants contained without putting them in above-ground containers. I have read a lot of ideas for this and most do not work, but I think this one might. It said to dig a hole deep enough to bury a five gallon bucket all but the top two inches. Put a five gallon bucket in it and fill in the dirt around it but not all the way to the lip. Fill the bucket with fresh soil and then plant the invasive plant in it.

I forgot to mention it needs to be a below-ground invasive plant like mint. The idea is that the roots can grow down or sideways but only go to the edge of the bucket and no farther. Because of the lip being above the ground it can’t crawl over either. I rather like this idea and will probably give it a try with my mint. If you no longer want the plant you just pull the bucket out and bye-bye plant.

I really like to try other people’s ideas and see if they work. I hope to see some innovative ideas in gardens around town this year.

  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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