Gardener's Grapevine 2013.03.27

Written by David Green.

Well, here we are again, Sunday afternoon. I’m lounging on the couch writing this and watching Red Neck Comedy tour, the Movie. First of all I didn’t know they made a movie; second, I’m sitting here thinking: if you might be a redneck if you mow your lawn and find a car, would you plant flowers?

I don’t know anyone with a lawn that could hide a car, but if I did why would they plant flowers or a garden if they don’t care about the yard? I’m pretty sure appearances are not going to be a priority, and a flower is not going to survive in a forest of grass anyway.

A few weeks ago I wrote about lawn décor from found or repurposed items. I did not mean refrigerators, cars or living room furniture. Today I saw a yard with a lot of old farm items for décor and it was very nicely done. They had a wagon wheel on each side of the drive and old hand-driven plows with landscaping around them in the yard. It was beautiful as they had a large lot so it did not overwhelm.

I was reading a magazine this week that was talking about unusual items to use for plant containers and they used old galvanized tubs and watering cans that weren’t able to hold water anymore without leakage. It said that if you place it in a garden it won’t matter if water leaks out because the ground will soak it up and it will have great drainage. I thought, what if you wanted it on a deck or porch? Then I thought why not do like I do the hanging baskets and line it with plastic bags that are under the lip so no one sees them: no leakage but all the old look style. If you do this you absolutely have to put some rock or such in the bottom to let the water escape the roots. Plants do not like wet feet.

I also read a new idea to keep invasive plants contained without putting them in above-ground containers. I have read a lot of ideas for this and most do not work, but I think this one might. It said to dig a hole deep enough to bury a five gallon bucket all but the top two inches. Put a five gallon bucket in it and fill in the dirt around it but not all the way to the lip. Fill the bucket with fresh soil and then plant the invasive plant in it.

I forgot to mention it needs to be a below-ground invasive plant like mint. The idea is that the roots can grow down or sideways but only go to the edge of the bucket and no farther. Because of the lip being above the ground it can’t crawl over either. I rather like this idea and will probably give it a try with my mint. If you no longer want the plant you just pull the bucket out and bye-bye plant.

I really like to try other people’s ideas and see if they work. I hope to see some innovative ideas in gardens around town this year.

  • Front.splash
    Water Fun—Carter Seitz and Colson Walter take a fast trip along a plastic sliding strip while water from a sprinkler provides the lubrication. The boys took a break from tie-dyeing last week at Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program to cool off in the water.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

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