The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Gardener's Grapevine 2013.03.06

Written by David Green.

Hasn’t the weather been a mess this past week? We had snow, sleet, rain and sunshine all in one week. Welcome to northern Ohio/southern Michigan where anything is possible at any time of the year.

We are getting ready for the arrival of our new little fellow and everyone is so excited. We met in Angola, Ind., with our good friends from Kalamazoo and had lunch. Of course conversation centered around the new baby and getting everything set. It amazes me the amount of stuff babies require to survive. I know much of it is for the caretakers’ convenience, and years ago it didn’t exist and children survived and grew into adults. Even when our children came along it was such a surprise at how much stuff one little person has. I couldn’t even begin to imagine raising triplets!

Thinking about this got me thinking about gardening gear and all we use to put in and maintain half decent gardens and lawns. It takes a lot of tools, pots, stakes, and lots of other items to maintain a garden. No matter what we do in life we seem to acquire “stuff,” it just seems to go with living. I have been on a kick lately of living with less stuff and simplifying my surroundings. If I don’t need it, use it or have to have it to maintain day to day life, why am I keeping it?

You can only wear so many clothes, sit on so much furniture, eat so much food and look at so many knickknacks in a day. So goes it with gardening tools. Do I really need four shovels and two shovel heads that need new handles? How many lopping tools can I use at once? Do I really need to keep every pair of pruning shears when I get new ones? Gardening is like everything else in life. We can get so bogged down with stuff that we can’t keep track of it and can’t find what we need when we need it. I plan to clean out my gardening shed in the spring just like I’m  doing with the house, and donate the excess to charity so maybe a would-be gardener on a short budget might try gardening.

I donate to St Vincent dePaul in Fayette because of their ethics. They are need based not income based and they don’t question why you need something, they just give it to you. Sounds like a perfect charity to me. Maybe my old pruners, shovels and pots will help feed someone from their own garden. 

On our way home from Indiana we drove straight back on 120. It is a pretty straight shot with a few curves and stops. We must have been coming home at feeding time for the deer. We saw a lot of herds of deer in the road, in the woods and in the fields. My daughter Jacquie and I were cooing over how cute they were and my husband, who was driving, was having conniptions over them possibly jumping on the car. None ever got close to jumping on us. I think someone called ahead and warned them we were coming as most of them just stood looking at us or grazing as we passed. The ones in the road ran as soon as they heard our car coming.

I often wonder what a deer thinks when it’s running around doing it’s business and all of a sudden there’s a car coming at them. My husband would laugh and tell me deer don’t think. I just wonder if we surprise them half as much as they surprise us. It’s a point to ponder. Wildlife and humans do not mix for the most part. When my daughter worked security at Wal-mart, a raccoon came in the front doors and was wandering around the store looking at people. It was quite a chore to get him back out of the store. My daughter watched the surveillance tapes to try and figure out where he went so the DNR could remove him. She said it was hilarious just watching him try to maneuver past the automatic front doors. Can you imagine how he felt wandering the store? He probably wondered why these humans need all this stuff.

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