Gardener's Grapevine 2013.01.16

Written by David Green.

As I’m writing this I am sitting in my husband’s hospital room at Toledo Hospital. He had a total hip replacement two weeks ago. I pick on him and tell him it’s so he doesn’t have to help me plant and weed the gardens this year. The truth of the matter is, he had an injury deep in his hip in college and it was repeatedly misdiagnosed. There comes a point with every injury when it has to be treated with the most extreme treatment to correct the issue.

As gardeners we utilize our bodies in many varying ways. Anybody who has ever put in a good hard day working in a garden hauling dirt, emptying wheelbarrows full of weeds, stooping, straightening  and crawling around on the ground is sure to know the end result on their body. Muscle aches and stiffness to the max, with an exhaustion that will make you want to sleep the sleep of the dead. True garden lovers will do what it takes to get where they want to be.

In most work settings now, ergonomics is a huge part of running any company. If the employees are not aware of their body mechanics there will be an increase in injuries and employee down time. Poor ergonomics can cause a lot of expense. The same can be said in all your home work, in and out of the garden.

When working close to the ground, you need to be aware of soreness. Instead of bending at the waist, bend your knees. Not only does it save your lower back, it works your gluteal muscles which are hard to stretch and work out. This way of bending will give gardeners that tight backside we all strive for and not make you have such a sore back that you can’t move without pain.

When emptying a wheelbarrow or wagon do not overfill it. Trying to lift all that weight can strain any number of joints and muscles. I use a wagon that has a dump feature on it and it also has a 400 pound load capacity. Well the wagon may be able to hold 400 pounds, but I can’t begin to lift that amount of weight. To dump it you must release a handle in the front of the wagon and lift it up. If I had 400 pounds in it where would that leave me? If you don’t have a dump feature, use a pitchfork and clean the debris out. 

Ergonomics goes for the small bones and muscles also. Do you weed by hand? What kind of stress does this put on the joints and muscles in your hands? Most all garden tools that are long-handled are available in handheld versions. Many have padded handles to further cut the stress to your hand muscles.

My good friend Sandy Cahill taught me a great way to cut down on stress to your knees when kneeling down to work on something. Take a bed pillow, wrap it in plastic and kneel on it, and no sore stressed knees.

As I watch my husband go through physical therapy learning to walk again, it reminds me that we need to take care of our bodies and decrease the stress when and where we can. Gardens can be well tended without injury and stress to the caretaker.

  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
  • Front.band
    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016