The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Gardener's Grapevine 2013.01.16

Written by David Green.

As I’m writing this I am sitting in my husband’s hospital room at Toledo Hospital. He had a total hip replacement two weeks ago. I pick on him and tell him it’s so he doesn’t have to help me plant and weed the gardens this year. The truth of the matter is, he had an injury deep in his hip in college and it was repeatedly misdiagnosed. There comes a point with every injury when it has to be treated with the most extreme treatment to correct the issue.

As gardeners we utilize our bodies in many varying ways. Anybody who has ever put in a good hard day working in a garden hauling dirt, emptying wheelbarrows full of weeds, stooping, straightening  and crawling around on the ground is sure to know the end result on their body. Muscle aches and stiffness to the max, with an exhaustion that will make you want to sleep the sleep of the dead. True garden lovers will do what it takes to get where they want to be.

In most work settings now, ergonomics is a huge part of running any company. If the employees are not aware of their body mechanics there will be an increase in injuries and employee down time. Poor ergonomics can cause a lot of expense. The same can be said in all your home work, in and out of the garden.

When working close to the ground, you need to be aware of soreness. Instead of bending at the waist, bend your knees. Not only does it save your lower back, it works your gluteal muscles which are hard to stretch and work out. This way of bending will give gardeners that tight backside we all strive for and not make you have such a sore back that you can’t move without pain.

When emptying a wheelbarrow or wagon do not overfill it. Trying to lift all that weight can strain any number of joints and muscles. I use a wagon that has a dump feature on it and it also has a 400 pound load capacity. Well the wagon may be able to hold 400 pounds, but I can’t begin to lift that amount of weight. To dump it you must release a handle in the front of the wagon and lift it up. If I had 400 pounds in it where would that leave me? If you don’t have a dump feature, use a pitchfork and clean the debris out. 

Ergonomics goes for the small bones and muscles also. Do you weed by hand? What kind of stress does this put on the joints and muscles in your hands? Most all garden tools that are long-handled are available in handheld versions. Many have padded handles to further cut the stress to your hand muscles.

My good friend Sandy Cahill taught me a great way to cut down on stress to your knees when kneeling down to work on something. Take a bed pillow, wrap it in plastic and kneel on it, and no sore stressed knees.

As I watch my husband go through physical therapy learning to walk again, it reminds me that we need to take care of our bodies and decrease the stress when and where we can. Gardens can be well tended without injury and stress to the caretaker.

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