The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.

Gardener's Grapevine 2012.12.19

Written by David Green.

Once again Sunday afternoon finds me in the living room. Not because I’m wrapping gifts or watching a movie, because I need to get this column out and the La-Z-Boy is there.

I became blessed this week with a raging sinus infection, thanks, I believe, to this crazy up and down weather. While sitting here trying to decide what to write this article on, I was looking at the Christmas tree and thinking about what a beautiful thing it is. We chose a scotch pine this year and it is very symmetrical. It amazes me how a tree so perfect can end up as our Christmas tree, and maybe it was a sin to cut it down. I go through this emotional bantering with myself every year, mostly because of my unending love of nature. In the end I always come to the same conclusion, that this tree was planted with the purpose of being someone’s Christmas tree and if not us then someone else would have cut it.

Art and I have thrown around the idea of having a Christmas tree farm for many years, and the people we purchase from have talked to us about it. There is a ton of work that goes into it. First, is research in knowing what trees sell the best, how many trees of each kind you will sell yearly on average and what the going rate is.

With all the statistics aside, there is a ton of work going to be done to get these trees in a position to be purchased. They start out as seedlings and are purchased in bulk at a price of $2 to $5 a piece, depending on the variety of the tree. Then they need to be planted. That’s not a bad job if it’s just one seedling, but try 2,500 seedlings.

The place we go to does not remove stumps, they cut them down to ground level and let them rot so as to renew the soil and feed the new seedlings. Once planted, the seedlings need to be fertilized, watered if it is a dry spell and weeds and anything else that can change a tree’s growth pattern must be kept cleared away. No one wants to pick a tree with a huge length of poison ivy growing in it! Then twice a year all the trees need pruned to keep a Christmas tree shape. Lastly, you must maintain the walking paths and be there selling the trees  from Thanksgiving through Christmas eve. 

While a Christmas tree farm sounds like a nice little sideline, it is a full time job that would include the entire family and much of everyone’s time. It’s something to ponder if this interests you and something to appreciate when that big beautiful tree is standing proudly in your living or family room.

On the topic of Christmas trees, I have a little story to share. My daughter and son-in-law purchased a little three-foot live tree this year and my daughter fretted  all the way home about what to do with her beloved cat “Rosie” and the tree.

“Mom I know she’s gonna climb it or knock it over!” I heard repeatedly on the way home from the tree farm.

“Well, sweetie, just throw her in it once it’s in it’s stand,” was my reply. “She’ll leave it alone once it bites her.” 

Of course her come back was, “I can’t do that! It will frighten her.” “Then she’ll leave it alone,” I said.

I figured it’d never happen and she’d have many episodes of broken bulbs. A week or so later my daughter said to me, “We threw the cat in the tree like you said and she won’t go near it!”

Wow! I guess mom knows something after all. It only took 27 years for her to admit it, even if it was indirectly.

Merry Christmas all and thanks for reading the column this past year.

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