Gardener's Grapevine 2012.12.12

Written by David Green.

This time of year everyone is so very busy getting ready for the holidays and it just seems to sneak up more quickly than most of us think. I have to be  very organized in thought and actions to accomplish all I want to and work over 50 hours at my paying job.

I love Christmas in all its tackiness and beauty. The fun of it is so worth the effort and with the dreariness of winter I wish it could last longer. When the lights come down after the holidays the drive home in the dark from work is just very blah.

Yesterday after church I decided that the rest of the gifts should get wrapped and it is such a tedious job, made more so by pickiness. So I plopped in a DVD and plopped myself on the living room floor with wrapping paper, ribbon, tape, scissors and a mug of hot egg nog. Don’t say gross if you’ve never tried it. 

My daughter and son-in-law came in and sat on the sofa to visit, thank goodness their presents weren’t out. They both started laughing themselves silly. I looked at them and raised an eyebrow (a little trick from my grandmother’s stores of looks!). They both pointed to the bay window and there sitting on our scaffolding was a fat, and I mean enormously fat, squirrel with his face pressed against the window watching us. It was raining and cold and this little fellow was not even bothered by it. In fact, I think if we had opened the window he would have joined us!

The scaffolding is an eyesore on the front of our house, but we have extensive work to do to the front of our home from the peak down. Since I am getting older and clumsier, if that is possible, I don’t do ladders any more than I have to. We have one that will reach up there, but there is no way I’m climbing it. Putting up the scaffolding is a lot of work and I did not want to take it back down just to put it back up in the spring. If I had known I would have a visitor, I wouldn’t even have considered taking it down. He is a funny little fellow, hope he returns again.

Last year I wrote an article on saving your poinsettias for the following year and how complicated it is. Well, the doctor I had spoke about that does save hers has succeeded again in her endeavors. She has many nice plants, not as full as the greenhouse ones. Hers are very spindly and have a lot fewer leaves, but they are blooming well. I personally don’t think they are worth the bother.

While we are on the topic of Christmas and presents, have you considered giving people on your list who are hard to buy for a live plant or a nice fresh wreath or centerpiece? They last way beyond the holiday and make homes smell wonderful. Also, don’t forget to water your Christmas tree as it is probably on the down side if you’ve had it up a bit.

Remember all the gardeners on your list this holiday and take a little time to enjoy nature. It’s probably looking in your front window right now.

  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

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