The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.

Gardener's Grapevine 2012.10.24

Written by David Green.

I love fall, even though the harvesting and dry leaves make my allergies go nuts. The trees and fields being harvested are so beautiful. The downside to such beauty is the barren cold winter months. Winter is so very necessary to our plants in this part of the country. The earth and trees need down time to sleep, renew and regroup.

With our warm winter and early summer last year the trees took a lot of stress. They lost a lot of their fruit due to the freakish weather. Some fruit trees did very well while others had next to nothing or lost most of their fruit early. Apparently, the giant oak tree in front of the Johnson’s next door did not suffer at all. That tree has dropped bushels of acorns. I can hear them pop on the driveway when someone drives over them. This is not so great for Mary as she has to clean them up from everywhere, but the squirrels are in heaven storing the acorns for winter.

Speaking of squirrels, the little buggers are so funny. I cleaned up some dead flowers that had gone to seed and prior to cutting the dead stems and disposing of them, I cut the dried seed heads off and left them in the flower beds. Later, I looked out the window to see squirrels running across the yard with the whole seed head that I had cut off. That had to be a very painful job to carry it up a tree as the coneflower seed heads are like thistles, very pokey.

What do you do with your seeds on the dead plants? Usually I let the dead stalks stay until spring so the birds can eat them when the snow is covering everything else. The only reason I cut the ones I did, is because when I’m in a cleaning up mood I tend to get carried away.

Speaking of cleaning up, don’t be in a huge hurry to clean everything out of your perennial beds. Some plants need a nice cover of leaves and dead vegetation to protect against the cold winter weather. My great grandmother Hila used to have me cover her roses with leaves every fall so they could act as insulation.

Other plants like the iris or hosta do not need such protection. If you are cleaning up your landscaping go ahead and trim the hostas since they have all frosted now and are not reaping any benefit from their leaves any longer.  While you are cleaning up, remember to take a note pad and write down which hostas need to be split in the spring. It is much easier to do the splitting if you write it down in the fall. By the time the hostas are full open, it is too difficult to split them and they will spend the rest of the summer trying to round themselves out again. They like to be round and will put a lot of effort into it.

By splitting the hostas while the leaves are still tightly rolled and small, they are a lot easier to handle. It takes very little for them to reround their shape as you will be splitting them while they are still partially dormant. I have a very grubby notebook in my gardening shed, but each spring it is a job I’m glad I do each fall.

In addition to cleaning up the beds, don’t forget the lawn. If you use chemicals it is time to apply winterizer. I also like to aerate in the fall; it gives the grass somewhere to stretch its roots in the spring.

While it is a lot of work to get everything cleaned up for winter you will be glad you made the effort. When the bleak winter winds blow, you will look out onto a tidy sleeping landscape. Besides, it gives our city workers job security cleaning up those giant piles of yard waste. They do such a great job of keeping everything clean and tidy, and they never complain. Thanks to our great city workers.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2015