Gardener's Grapevine 2012.10.17

Written by David Green.

Last Saturday our entire family went to Cincinnati for our nephew Jake’s wedding. It was the most unusual wedding I have ever been to. It was held at Krohn Conservatory. Since we had never been there we were not sure where we were going or what to expect, but it was more than any of us expected.

I’m not really sure what the property originally was used for, but we did find out the greenhouses were started in the 1930s. The main greenhouse was a two story and had five additional greenhouses attached to it. The main greenhouse where the wedding was held had a waterfall that fell from the highest part of the ceiling over rocks and into a pool that emptied into a stream that flowed throughout the greenhouse.

Tropical plants grew all around in abundance, and some of the palms were over 20 feet tall. It was pretty amazing. Throughout the entire wedding you could hear the water falling behind the bride and groom. Water falling over rocks or crashing to the shore has to be one of the most beautiful sounds ever. After dinner in the butterfly greenhouse we could tour the other three.

I have no idea where the butterflies went during our use of their room, but I didn’t see any and we were in there quite a while and it was plenty warm enough for them to be out. There was, however, an interesting fruit tree in one corner full of cantaloupe-sized fruit. It was called an ugly fruit tree. The fruit didn’t seem too ugly to me; I guess it’s a matter of opinion. 

There was a tree behind our table that had a name I couldn’t pronounce, but it looked all gnarled, had few leaves and stringy looking moss hanging off it like grey hair. We all laughed because the trunk looked like a wrinkled up face.

One of the other greenhouses had very old bonsai trees in many different varieties. I don’t believe I’ve ever seen bonsais quite that old. Another greenhouse held every orchid you could ever imagine. I don’t know much at all about orchids except they are fragile and interesting to look at. Supposedly there was an orchid that smelled like chocolate. I smelled it and all I got was the smell of dirt. Either my sense of smell has gone south or somebody has an active imagination.

The fourth greenhouse had desert plants which translated to cacti. This room was interesting. Everything I looked at had thorns in many varying sizes. There was a tree in that room that had thorns all around its trunk in a swirling pattern and rows about an inch apart. The boughs of the tree had millions of thorns in tight succession all along them. I think we found the perfect squirrel-proof place for a bird feeder! The cacti room gave me a kind of futuristic creepy sense. I am glad I don’t have to spend much time in there. 

The fifth greenhouse was supposed to be like the Amazon and it was really neat. There was a pomegranate tree with baseball-sized pomegranates hanging on it. The cocoa bean tree did smell like chocolate and in the center of this greenhouse was a banyan tree of some size. Now, banyan trees I know about. We go to the John and Mabel Ringling museums in Sarasota, Fla., and they have huge banyans that are very old. Banyans are interesting in that they send out aerial roots that hang down and start growing into the ground. These form limbs that are like another tree trunk, and really odd looking. The largest banyan I ever saw was Thomas Edison’s at his Fort Meyers laboratory. It is as big as an entire parking lot and still growing! Apparently the banyan in the greenhouse got frequent hair cuts as there was a very tall ladder leaned against the tree.

If you ever have time to kill in Cincinnati, I would recommend you check out the Krohn Conservatory.

  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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