Gardener's Grapevine 2012.10.03

Written by David Green.

I am sitting in the dining room visiting with my mother-in-law Betty Erbskorn, who is more like a mother to me, and enjoying a Sunday afternoon catching up. She is a very kind lady and is also a great gardener and talented florist. She is putting together a wreath and some decorative items I intended to use for the office for harvest time. She is doing a far nicer job than I ever could have and my co-workers will be surprised. She worked for Kibler’s Flower Shop for 13 years. She tells some great stories about working there and the things they did. I am blessed to have such a sweet lady in my life, it’s no wonder her son is such a good man.

While she was here she told me she had some hollyhock seeds someone had given to her and wanted to know when to plant them. So we did a little Googling and found out that you can plant them in the fall or spring depending on when you want to. Planting in the fall gets a good solid root system going. Hollyhocks can stand colder temperatures and while other plants are going dormant they are sprouting and laying down strong systems. The following spring there will be strong sprouts and the stalks will grow more quickly because of the already developed root systems and the blooms will develop from there. The articles also said it was fine to plant them in the spring too, except most of the growing season will be spent in setting down the main root systems and there won’t be many blooms. The second year it will be loaded with blooms.

Hollyhocks are an old flower that came here with early settlers. I made the mistake of planting every color of hollyhock when we moved here. The mistake is that the darker colors dominate and eventually that will be all you have. For a few years mine were pretty then I planted a black one…novelty always grabs me…and all I get now are deep purple flowers that look very black. They’re not so pretty, but they’re extremely hardy.

Hollyhocks do not spread as fast as some perennials​ like morning glory. We fenced the yard in when the children were small to keep the dog in along with the kids. The dog stayed in the fence but not the children, they climbed over about as soon as we got it all up. Our current dog climbs over it and goes with whomever happens to walk by. I had the crazy idea to plant morning glories to hide the chain link from Main Street. I bought a lot of packages of seeds and planted them. Well, the kids are adults living on their own and I am still pulling out morning glories from everywhere possible. Unless you don’t care how crazy they go I would suggest not planting them. Left unattended in a few years I’m quite sure it would be hard to find our house under the vines.

Any time someone offers you a plant they want to get rid of, ask questions, like why? What does it do? How fast does it multiply? That way when you can’t find the dog for all the vines you can only blame yourself!

  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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