Gardener's Grapevine 2012.09.19

Written by David Green.

This day was very upside down. I went to church without my husband which is weird. He is working on his thesis paper to complete his master’s. Unfortunately, when you have a deadline of Sunday at midnight as a due date and you work 50-60 hours a week you are always fighting for time to meet one deadline or another.

I usually do this article after church as I need to use Art’s computer to be able to send it to the editor. I instead am writing this at 8:30 at night. It is probably a good thing, as I went out to see our friends just off Mulberry Road. Anyone from around here knows about the old gravel pit on Mulberry. It’s been an illegal playground for many off-roaders around here for my entire life. Well, not any more. It is now very cleaned up and nice. There are no more trails or rusty gates. It has a pond and on the far side of the pond are rushes.

I have watched the work being done all year long. In the spring I noticed a dark teal color to the pond. Someone had put some kind of chemicals in it for some purpose. I don’t know a lot about ponds and the treatments put in them, but I do know I’ve gotten a huge kick out of watching the rushes turn teal colored. They are fading now, but for most of the summer they have reminded me of being a child.

My grandmother would walk with me down Stateline Road where she lived and we would collect Queen Anne’s Lace from the side of the road. She would put warm water in a vase and add food coloring and in a few hours the flower would be that color. To a kid this was so cool. I just knew I had the neatest, smartest grandmother in the whole world. (Don’t let her know I still feel that way, OK?) As an adult seeing a large area of seven-foot rushes turn color due to dye still fascinates me how it works. My mother-in-law taught me a long time ago that is how many hot house flowers that are used in arrangements get their color. Next time you drive by the old gravel pit take a moment to check out how nice it looks.

Tuesday we had a Garden Club meeting and made cement birdbaths from large garden leaves. I used a huge hosta leaf and can’t wait to see it when it’s dry. We also had a meeting where we discussed our upcoming fund-raiser. All our money goes for one basic purpose, to improve the aesthetics of our fair town through natural purposes. We supply and have planted the hanging baskets downtown, and plant flowers at the park, city entrance sign and library. We also plant trees and donate to civic causes such as the watering systems on the light poles and snowflakes at Christmas.

With all that said, we also encourage people to improve their own property’s aesthetics by purchasing from our fund-raisers. In the spring we sold geraniums and this fall on the 21st we will have a mum sale. If you would like to purchase a beautiful mum to make your home pop in the fall, stop by the old depot on Main Street between 9 a.m. and noon. They are hardy plants (cold tolerant) in eight-inch pots and the plants themselves are huge. They cost three for $15 or $7 for one and if you would like to preorder you can contact Renée at City Hall or Sandy Wheeler by September 19th. I have already ordered mine and you should, too, and think of all the good you are doing in the community.

Our other fund raiser is a nifty new little hoe that works so great for weeding quickly. They will be on display and sale at the plant sale. For everyone who supports our efforts, thank you so very much. We couldn’t do it without all of 

  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
  • Front.band
    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

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