Gardener's Grapevine 2012.09.05

Written by David Green.

The Fulton County Fair was this past weekend. It is in my opinion the best fair around. One of the reasons I feel that way is cleanliness. They keep the place tidy and spruced up. In Art’s family the fair is a big deal. His father went every year of his life. When Art and I started dating I couldn’t understand the desire to go to the fair more than once. What do you do? I’d ask. Visit and see the exhibits and eat was the answer.

As the past 30 years have passed, our children have been in 4-H at that fair, we’ve both worked and made friends all around the area, and now even I get excited about the fair. It’s just plain fun. I get so excited to eat the crazy fattening food and see all the people I worked with or knew from my days as a nurse in that county. 

Let’s talk about the food. No other time of year do I eat an éclair funnel cake. It’s deep fried dough covered in powdered sugar, a huge glob of bavarian cream, and drizzled with chocolate. Two forks please…Art has to help me with this. We carry this crazy blood sugar raising mess around and check out the animals that by the way will be on someone’s dinner table next week, the grange produce and canning entries, and the art exhibits.

The Grange is a place a lot of people don’t even pay much attention to, but as a gardener, it is one of my “must sees.” When Morenci was mostly a farming community the Granges were hugely popular. It was a social meeting place for farmers and anyone in the local area that had an interest in their activities. There aren’t many Granges left.

I like looking at what the members have grown. They show huge pumpkins, squash tomatoes, and just about anything else that can be harvested. They also display their talent at canning. Their jars look so beautiful lined up and shiny. I always see something that looks like it would taste great.

The Granges also display a lot of sewing, particularly quilts of all sorts of things.  A few years back I took some old quilts to Sauder Village to have them evaluated as possible donations. The lady who met with us showed us a quilt from the Morenci Grange that was raffled off many years ago. It had embroidered sections like a Dresden plate pattern and inside each piece was a name of a grange member. It was fascinating to see some very familiar names from days past. 

This week I will be canning tomatoes and thinking of all the gorgeous cans of food lined up for show at the fair. One new thing I’m going to try with the rest of the green beans is “Dilly beans.” It’s a recipe to pickle green beans from a lady my daughter works with. They sound so good. After the fair is done it is always nice to get home to my fresh organic produce and low fat diet. There is only so much éclair funnel cake a person can stand…at least ’til next year.

  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rover
    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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