The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

Gardener's Grapevine 2012.08.15

Written by David Green.

This past week has been a rather challenging one in my life. I have been a nurse for 25 years this year. I consider myself an old dog when it comes to OB/GYN, as I’ve spent most of my career in that area.

Our office switched over to electronic medical records this week and what a headache. After eight hours I was brain dead and it took all I had to drive home.  Change is hard and scary. I, as well as most people, like what I know because a certain amount of peace and comfort comes with routine. Such is the same in gardening.

A lot of gardeners do the same things year after year as it works for them and it’s their comfort zone. With the weather the last few years, and especially this year, we are all forced out of our comfort zones in the gardening world. I realized this with my peas. I read an article that said get your peas in the ground as soon as possible in the spring, even while the earth is still thawing. As global warming gives us hotter, longer summers, our pea planting is required sooner than ever. Next year I will try to get them in the ground in February or March.

At church today Judy Heiney asked me if it is too late to prune roses. I had to stop and think about this. The answer is “no.” Basically, in our area it’s OK through August and possibly early September. As the nights get colder they need to be left alone to get ready to go dormant in winter. 

Roses love to be pruned and even if it’s not done correctly they will grow back. It’s hard to kill them with pruning. First, make sure all your tools are clean and sharp. Dirty tools can give a rose a disease and that may very well kill it. I wash all my tools with Dawn dish soap, rinse them well and lay them in the sun to dry.

Prune from the base of the plant opening up the center to encourage good air flow. This will help avoid fungus and disease. Make a 45 degree cut ¼-inch above a bud nodule. Clean, smooth cuts are best. Ragged cuts stress the plant. Remove any dry, diseased, damaged foliage and discard it in the trash. Do not throw it on ground as it will damage or reinfect the plant.

When you stop pruning for the season, stop feeding also. The plant doesn’t like to go dormant on a full stomach. Speaking of which, if your potted plants are looking less than awesome it may be due to a decrease in food. Most potted plants are in soil that automatically feeds the plants for three months. So if you planted your pot in May, the food in the soil has been all used up. A good fertilizer will perk it up. 

The reason for the roses going crazy right now is due to the weather. They love rain and cooler temps. So do I, but until I get a handle on this new form of charting, don’t look for me to be blooming. A smile is about it.

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