Gardener's Grapevine 2012.08.08

Written by David Green.

Art and I took three days to do the 127 garage sales with another couple even though it was unbelievably hot and they were spaced way far apart. It was a blast. I have never been much of a garage sale person, mostly because I have too much “stuff” as it is.

One thing we did find was another wire basket with a handle. If you’ve never used one, they work great for lots of things but the best is to harvest vegetables. They are sturdy so the bottom won’t fall out, light enough for anyone to carry when fully loaded (the basket, not the person) and they last season after season. If you come across one of these baskets they also have sturdy metal handles with a covered grip to keep your hands from hurting.

Gardening magazines charge $25 to $50 for them depending on size. Mine cost $1, making it well worth the trip. We won’t discuss the gas prices to go get it. Maybe it wasn’t a steal, but I’m still happy. 

When we left Wednesday for Cincinnati to start this excursion, the grass was still burned and the beans were one to two days away from being fully ready. When we got home, our lawn looked like a hay field. What happened?

Art and I decided we’d better go to the church Saturday evening after it cooled down and see if it needed mowing prior to services on Sunday. Art mows, I prune.  He started the mower, did one half pass and the mower died. We don’t own another mower and the church doesn’t have one. What to do? Put new gas in? 

Started and died, started and died, started and died. This went on quite a while. We put dry gas in and it started and ran a little longer, then died. My sweet-tempered husband was not looking so sweet-tempered.

I decided it’s God’s house and lawn, I’d ask for his help and sent up a little request for some assistance. He listened, but I think he misunderstood, “please help us with this situation” to mean I want to go home, as it started to lightning and thunder. I figured a lot of folks at church would inquire as to what was up with the lawn, but no one did. 

I would assume you all have gardens going crazy about right now. Mine is pumping out tomatoes like a regular little factory and everything else is coming along great, too. Our sweet corn did not produce well at all and I don’t understand why. I think I will do a little soil testing in the spring before planting again and see what is up. We watered it religiously and used new seed. It produced a meal’s worth of normal sized ears on the first planting and a meal’s worth of stubby well-filled out ears on the second planting. I’m not sure if it was the heat or if the soil is lacking something. I have a small soil testing kit, guess it’s time to use it. 

I said the beans really took off and I wasn’t kidding. One good thing we did this year was plant pole beans next to our new garden fence and bush beans below the pole beans. It worked out beautifully.  They are really easy to pick and they climbed the fence pickets without any assistance. I hope all your gardens are putting a huge bounty on the supper table.

  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.grieders
    ONE-TWO PUNCH—Morenci’s Griffin Grieder saved his best for last, running his fastest time ever in the 110-meter high hurdles at the state finals Saturday in Grand Rapids to finish first in the state in Div. IV. His brother Luke, a junior (right), claimed the state runner-up spot. Bulldog junior Bailee Dominique placed seventh in the 100-meter dash.
  • Front.sidewalk
    MORENCI senior class president Mikayla Price leads the way Sunday afternoon from the Church of the Nazarene to the United Methodist Church for the baccalaureate ceremony. Later in the day, 39 members of the senior class received diplomas in the high school gymnasium.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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