Gardener's Grapevine 2012.08.01

Written by David Green.

Sometimes when I write this article I feel like the local farm report for crops. If you consider I know next to nothing about actual crop farming, it’s kind of a comical thought.

This summer with the drought I guess the crops are on all our minds, even the people who have never set foot on a farm. I work with people who don’t even plant a flowerpot and they talk about the drought’s effect on the crops and food supply.

This weekend Art and I made a trip to Angola, Ind., to see friends. The crops weren’t looking too bad, there were ears on the corn and it looked to be pretty tall in most places. Granted, none of the fields anywhere look topnotch.

I am a big fan of farmer’s markets. Some communities have massive ones. When we are in Kalamazoo on a Saturday we try to go to theirs, as it is awesome. Not only do you get fresh fruit and vegetables, but also a wide array of other things related to nature are on display like potted plants, seedlings, cut flowers, baked goods, skin care products made from plants and many more items. All are from small businesses that are able to display all their wares and discuss them. I saw an ad on TV this week for farmer’s markets and they said, “be a localvore” meaning eat locally grown produce. I thought that was a really good word.  Eating locally grown produce helps support people in our own towns. 

Have you looked at your hostas? Do they have brown burnt leaves? Well intense heat with no water will do that. I did a little reading on what to do to improve the looks of them without killing them or damaging their health. Most of what I read is that a hosta’s strength comes from its root system not its leaves. You should trim off the damaged leaves down by the base and leave the good ones. You can even prune them all the way back to the ground and leave no leaves and the plant will still come back in the spring. It will not put much effort into becoming larger, but will not die either. They truly are the wonder plant that anyone can grow. 

Are you pruning your roses? With the recent shift in weather, my roses are trying to rebound. A pruning off of the dead heads and hips will encourage new growth and give you new blooms (if it’s an ever-blooming variety).

With the weather change a lot of pruning, weeding and attention needs to be given to our gardens. Don’t grumble either, because with the drought you’ve had a reprieve from doing much weeding this summer. I can tell all of you not to grumble, but if you were in our garden Saturday you would have heard a lot of grumbling as I pulled out an enormous amount of weeds.

We are starting to get a lot of tomatoes and I was hoping for a big mass of green beans. The beans had lots of immature ones and masses of blooms but not many mature beans. Isn’t it hard to be patient for something so yummy! Guess I’ll just have to be satisfied with some more BLTs…what a sacrifice! (that was sarcasm–I love them!)

  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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