Gardener's Grapevine 2012.07.18

Written by David Green.

The break from the heat was nice, I guess. It’s funny how less than 100 degrees can feel like heaven. All this heat has baked my peas in the vegetable garden and they looked so nice. We pulled the vines this past week and the potatoes are not ready yet. All the water in the world couldn’t save them, they can’t ever take the heat. This year I think I could have planted them in February and been safe.

Weird hardly describes our weather in the past year. Anyone who knows Art and me knows we live in what a lot of people refer to as the Rutledge house. In my great-grandmother’s time, it would have been the Stanager house.

We have lived here and worked on this house the majority of our married life. We’ve found lots of things that fall into the “what the heck” category and a few “eeewwww” items such as  the mummified cat in the crawl space. We thought it crawled under there and died, but we couldn’t figure out how as it is sealed. Then we read an article in Old House Journal that told how Victorians often put mummified cats in their basements and attics to ward off evil spirits. The real catcher was that people today collect these things. Some folks just need a different hobby. Anyway, ours went to that great garbage heaven in Adrian known as the dump.

This magazine is interesting. It covers a little of everything to do with homes.  Lots of DIY, Q&A, old homes for sale, new product evals, and of course, my favorite—gardening. Just like everything in my life these days, I get to this magazine when I get to it, which is never the month it arrives, probably because I’d have to pry it out of Art’s hands first. I came home from work today and sat for a few minutes checking out an issue that I hadn’t seen yet, and there was an article in it about edible flowers.

Some of the flowers everyone knows about like nasturtiums and lavender. The article said to stuff the centers of nasturtiums with cream cheese or fold them into an omelet, as they have a peppery punch to them and add color to the table.

A new use for lavender was to grind the buds into a powder and mix one tablespoon into two cups of superfine sugar to add a fragrant flavor to many things including lemonade and whipped cream. It sounds really good. I like to fold lavender into frosting.

Flowers I did not know you could eat were cornflowers, which have an earthy clove-like taste, but cloves can be really overpowering, so I would go easy with this one. Another edible flower is daylilies. You can eat the closed buds or remove the bitter stamens and spoon chicken salad or such into the flower cup. White, cream and yellow are the sweetest varieties. 

Portulaca is a flower used to thicken soups and add vitamins to salads. It is rich in omega 3 fatty acids. The flowers, leaves, and stems are all edible and have a salty spinach-like flavor. While some flowers are edible, not all are and it would be wise to check out a flower prior to using it on the dinning table as some can be poisonous.

This week I noticed the Queen Annes Lace is blooming as is the chickory along the roadsides. Both are extremely drought tolerant. With the downturn in the economy, our ditch banks are not being mowed like in the past, so these beautiful flowers have made a comeback. If you’re bored, take a road trip and look for different wildflowers. It makes for a pleasant afternoon.

  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.snake
    Lannis Smith of the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor shows off a python last week at Stair District Library's Summer Reading Program.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.rock Study
    ROCKHOUNDS—From the left, Joseph McCullough, Sean Pagett and Jonathan McCullough peer through hand lenses to study rocks. The project is part of Morenci Elementary School’s summer camp that continues into August.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2017