Gardener's Grapevine 2012.07.04

Written by David Green.

Sunday afternoon finds me on the side porch in a wicker chair with a glass of lemonade and a passed out old labrador at my feet. It’s hot and so is she.

I love laptop computers, you can take them anywhere. Art is working on the arbor and gates to our new garden fence. Delight Gillen told me she didn’t like my new fence because she couldn’t see my vegetable garden. I think that was the point in putting it up and to keep a vegetable-stealing lab (who especially likes tomatoes) out of it.

What a hard summer it has been so far for our gardens. We have two apple trees and they are dropping their fruit from lack of rain. Being an OB nurse, it reminds me of when a pregnant woman is dehydrated, and it will actually cause her to go into labor as her body tries to preserve itself. Basically the tree is doing the same thing. It is so stressed it drops its fruit in an effort to save itself. I’m not seeing this action in the pear tree, however its fruit is turning color much earlier this year.

Art and I went to our favorite Chinese restaurant Saturday in Swanton. As we were driving the back roads I was looking the fields and yards over. The wheat is mostly in now. A few farmers were finishing up as we went by, but for the most part even the straw was baled. It was a beautiful harvest—big full heads all golden colored.

It is not, however, going to be a good year for the corn for some farmers. We saw corn tasseled out that was only two to three feet tall. Some of it was beginning to burn and dry up, others had leaves very tightly curled and pointed skyward like it was begging for a drink. Art and I were commenting about how hard it will be for the farmers if the corn is poor. I know our area is the beginning of the corn belt, but it isn’t much better west of here either. A poor yield will drive food costs up yet again and that includes the meat animals that eat the corn. The cost of ethanol fuel will also rise.

Art and I water our gardens, but not the yard. I can’t see watering something that comes back no matter what happens unless it’s actually set on fire. Does it not amaze you how our yards can be rock hard dry and the buckhorn is as green and healthy as ever? It’s kind of like life, the things we cherish and want to be around often wear out or leave, and those we wish would leave are around forever. I don’t know which of Murphy’s laws that is, but it must be one of them.

I have a butterfly bush I planted probably ten years ago and it throws babies every year. I’ve given away many of them. If I untied that bush I bet it would be six feet or better across. When another butterfly bush popped up this spring on the corner of the side porch, I assumed it was a baby of my other bush. I didn’t really want it there, but it wasn’t hurting anything so I left it. This week it started blooming and has the largest blooms I’ve ever seen. They are at least a foot long. My other bushes produce blooms about four to six inches long. It is a very nice bush so it can stay.

As I sit here, the hummingbirds are very busy at my hanging baskets. They move so rapidly that if you didn’t know what they were you would miss them.

  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Girls.on.ride
    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
  • Front.softball
    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.soccer.balls
    BEVY OF BALLS—Stair District Library Summer Reading Program VolunTeens, including Libby Rorick, back left and Ty Kruse, back right, threw a dozen inflatable soccer balls into the crowd during a reading of “Sergio Saves the Game.” The sports-themed program continues on Wednesdays through July 27.
  • Front.art.park
  • Front.drum
  • Shadow.salon

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016