Gardener's Grapevine 2012.05.30

Written by David Green.

It’s interesting how people spend Memorial Day weekend. Some go to campgrounds, lakes or take a trip. Other people work in their yards or at their homes. Most everyone I know visits a cemetery and takes a moment to think about our soldiers past and present. Flags come out all over the place and I have to say our town does an over-the-top job of displaying old glory. Most gardeners have a flag flying somewhere on their property and many have more than one flying.

The weather lately has been extremely dry and it is important to remember your plants especially if they are in the hot sun. 

There are so many different ways to water. I’m a huge fan of timers. They work really well with drip irrigation systems. Art and I put in a system called Rainbird and it was very easy to install, especially for me, as I watched Art do it. But he said it was very simple to understand.

It consists of long hoses with holes every so many inches and you plant your plant by the holes. The type of hose you buy depends on what you are using it for. If your plants are six inches apart there is hose available for that, and it goes all the way down to two inches apart.

You can also buy solid hose with junctions that allow for smaller drip hoses to go to individual pots. No more standing around at night watering all the flowerpots with a hose and nozzle. Turn on the water and everything is watered at once. The timer makes it so you can have everything watered prior to coming home from work and it is easy to weed in the evenings, everything pulls right out.

At present, the ground is hard as a brick so watering is an absolute necessity. Some people still like the old fashioned oscillating sprinklers or the arching back and forth type. Both are fine if you are doing a large area and need everything to get wet. Anything in its path will get soaked and there will be more weeds, where as drip irrigation only waters the individual plant which cuts down on weeds.

This type of watering system also works great for hanging baskets. You just use the solid hosing run along the top of your porch roof and stick the end nozzle in the basket and set your timer. That is the same type of system being used in the hanging baskets uptown.

There are some nice hose nozzles on the market also. I like a long armed wand for baskets if I’m not using drip irrigation. Whatever type of system you use make sure to water often and have good drainage for your plants. They do not like constant wet feet, nor do they like dried out roots, so knowing how much water is needed and keeping a well irrigated pot will make for a happier and fuller plant specimens. 

A couple Art and I are friends with live on Sims Highway and while visiting with them they showed me a rarely seen type of bird called an indigo bunting. It is the size of a goldfinch with dark blue feathers all over except for its black head and wing tips. It was an amazingly beautiful bird. They also saw a red headed woodpecker at their feeder and they are another rare and not often seen type of bird.

Hopefully, with people becoming more and more conscious of our carbon footprint we will see more unusual species of all types of animals. The hawks are making a fabulous comeback. Some folks see them as a nuisance, but there was a time not long ago when you hardly ever saw one. We all have a place in this big old world and we all need a drink of water. Give your potted friends one frequently.

  • Play Practice
    DRAMA—Fayette schools, in conjunction with the Opera House Theater program, will present two plays Friday night at the Fayette Opera House. From the left is Autumn Black, Wyatt Mitchell, Elizabeth Myers, Jonah Perdue, Sam Myers (in the back) and Lauren Dale. Other cast members are Brynn Balmer, Mason Maginn, Ashtyn Dominique, Stephanie Munguia and Sierra Munguia. Jason Stuckey serves as the technician and Trinity Leady is the backstage manager. The plays will be performed during the day Friday for students and for the public at 7 p.m. Friday.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rover
    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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