Gardener's Grapevine 2012.05.02

Written by David Green.

What a beautiful Sunday—the sun’s shining and the temperature is nice. The frost has had me a little worried this past week; it got pretty cold many nights, but my plants seem to have come through without any issues. I have irises blooming and it is so weird, as they normally bloom in May around Memorial Day. My great-grandmother called them flags and I do, too, just because it reminds me of her and she was a neat lady.

Irises are very easy to grow and very drought tolerant. Their underground roots are called rhizomes. Irises grow in circular or fan shapes, and once established they require little care. They are divided into classes and these classes are determined by plant height. An iris can be anywhere from eight inches to 27 inches tall, and they come in many different colors and some are even bicolored.

Irises prefer to be planted in light loamy soil that is well drained, and grow best in full to partial sun. They should be planted so that the top third of the rhizome is above ground. They do not require fertilizer, but if you must fertilize do not apply fertilizer directly to the exposed rhizomes as this can cause them to be burned by the harsh chemicals.

After the flowers bloom, cut the flower stems back to an inch or two above the rhizomes. In the fall, trim the leaves to six inches above the rhizomes and destroy the cut off part. This will keep any disease that may have invaded the leaves out of your garden.

If dividing irises is desired, the ideal time is four to six weeks after flowering. To divide the plant, cut the leaves back four to six inches above the rhizome, spade down through the rhizomes and take out a clump. Rinse the roots well. Each new plant should be  a short fan of leaves, a rhizome, and healthy looking white roots to plant in the ground. 

Irises are a deer resistant plant. Never mulch the iris, it does not like its rhizomes covered with anything. Irises are beautiful plants and are very easy maintenance. If you are just starting a garden it is a great choice.

I was so glad to see the rain end, but not quite as happy as the cats in my husband’s workshop. They like to go outside to play. Most of the week they put their heads out the door and looked at me as if to say, “If you think it’s such a great idea to go out in that, you can do it.”

Crankshaft is the orange tabby cat and he doesn’t have a plan when he asks to go out, he just likes to lay on the sidewalk and soak up the sun. His largest daily expenditure of energy is in getting to the food dish. He’s a sweet cat, but I think he got the memo that momma doesn’t like gifts of dead mice and birds as he stopped bringing them to me. Having a cat outside in town is not a good idea, but Crankshaft doesn’t prescribe to good ideas. His  opinion is, I am a cat, I do as I please, deal with it. I’ve met people with that attitude, too.

  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.snake
    Lannis Smith of the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor shows off a python last week at Stair District Library's Summer Reading Program.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.rock Study
    ROCKHOUNDS—From the left, Joseph McCullough, Sean Pagett and Jonathan McCullough peer through hand lenses to study rocks. The project is part of Morenci Elementary School’s summer camp that continues into August.

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