The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

Gardener's Grapevine 2012.05.02

Written by David Green.

What a beautiful Sunday—the sun’s shining and the temperature is nice. The frost has had me a little worried this past week; it got pretty cold many nights, but my plants seem to have come through without any issues. I have irises blooming and it is so weird, as they normally bloom in May around Memorial Day. My great-grandmother called them flags and I do, too, just because it reminds me of her and she was a neat lady.

Irises are very easy to grow and very drought tolerant. Their underground roots are called rhizomes. Irises grow in circular or fan shapes, and once established they require little care. They are divided into classes and these classes are determined by plant height. An iris can be anywhere from eight inches to 27 inches tall, and they come in many different colors and some are even bicolored.

Irises prefer to be planted in light loamy soil that is well drained, and grow best in full to partial sun. They should be planted so that the top third of the rhizome is above ground. They do not require fertilizer, but if you must fertilize do not apply fertilizer directly to the exposed rhizomes as this can cause them to be burned by the harsh chemicals.

After the flowers bloom, cut the flower stems back to an inch or two above the rhizomes. In the fall, trim the leaves to six inches above the rhizomes and destroy the cut off part. This will keep any disease that may have invaded the leaves out of your garden.

If dividing irises is desired, the ideal time is four to six weeks after flowering. To divide the plant, cut the leaves back four to six inches above the rhizome, spade down through the rhizomes and take out a clump. Rinse the roots well. Each new plant should be  a short fan of leaves, a rhizome, and healthy looking white roots to plant in the ground. 

Irises are a deer resistant plant. Never mulch the iris, it does not like its rhizomes covered with anything. Irises are beautiful plants and are very easy maintenance. If you are just starting a garden it is a great choice.

I was so glad to see the rain end, but not quite as happy as the cats in my husband’s workshop. They like to go outside to play. Most of the week they put their heads out the door and looked at me as if to say, “If you think it’s such a great idea to go out in that, you can do it.”

Crankshaft is the orange tabby cat and he doesn’t have a plan when he asks to go out, he just likes to lay on the sidewalk and soak up the sun. His largest daily expenditure of energy is in getting to the food dish. He’s a sweet cat, but I think he got the memo that momma doesn’t like gifts of dead mice and birds as he stopped bringing them to me. Having a cat outside in town is not a good idea, but Crankshaft doesn’t prescribe to good ideas. His  opinion is, I am a cat, I do as I please, deal with it. I’ve met people with that attitude, too.

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