The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Gardener's Grapevine 2012.03.21

Written by David Green.

It’s a wet, drab Sunday afternoon. Art assured me last evening that it wouldn’t rain. Now I have a wagon full of brush and rainwater. Apparently he wasn’t cut out to be a weatherman.

Yesterday afternoon I cleaned up the vegetable garden, pruned, and moved and tied up the raspberries. My dad came home and said he knew of better things to do on a Saturday afternoon. Really, dad? Better than playing in the dirt until all your muscles scream for mercy and you look like you took a dirt bath? What could possibly be more fun? Certainly all the scratches from the prickly canes qualify as fun.

My Uncle Dwight is the first person I know of to can something this year. He canned horseradish from our garden. He retired this past year and has always been a big gardener. He and my aunt taught me to can when I first got married.

He showed me his plant starts and they look great. He has some very nice tomato plants he started from seed. They are about 3-4 inches tall with nice sturdy stems. He also started a bean plant indoors, which produced two beans so far. My aunt laughingly said she’d stir-fry them for him if he wants.

As I’ve said before, it is extremely hard to start tomatoes from seed, and my uncle makes it look so easy. He is trying the toilet paper roll starters that I talked about a couple of months ago. Using the center of toilet paper rolls to start plants, and then transplanting them while they are still in the rolls made a lot of sense to me. I can’t wait to see his results. Like everything else, I bet it works great for him. He just has a green thumb gardener’s touch.

Art planted peas yesterday and he probably will have a great harvest with our weather the way it is. I hope the freezing weather is past. I always worry about that one last bad frost on tender new leaves, but hopefully we won’t get one.

Lori at the library said she couldn’t help it, she uncovered her plants and is taking her chances…true gardeners just can’t help themselves! As Art and I were working in the garden, we talked about how we had tried the garden mounding idea last year and how we felt about it. We both felt it worked really well. It made it easier to pick and maintain and there were fewer weeds. I do know we have cleaned up fewer weeds so far. Art has a bad hip and repeated bending is hard, so this has made gardening a bit easier on him.

What you do is till the garden and mound the rows up. It looks like we have a bunch of graves in the garden. The following years you are not supposed to have to till it again, just reuse the mounds. Art did till between the mounds to re-pile the dirt up and to plant the peas in the lower area, since they will harvest earlier than the rest. The idea is to use the lower areas as pathways.

Art was concerned with water shedding off the mounds last year so this year we are going to run a soaker hose or drip irrigation hose down the rows on the mounds. We had a nice harvest but he thinks the harvest will improve with increased water. Whatever makes him happy and keeps him out of trouble works for me! After all he’s the engineer in the family. My happiness is in seeing a plant from seed to full fruition and knowing I did that. Spring arrives this week. Enjoy.

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