The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

Gardener's Grapevine 2012.02.29

Written by David Green.

Art and I went to Toledo Sunday afternoon for lunch and a trip to the art museum. The museum had a show going on titled “Small Worlds.” It was not what either of us expected. We expected miniature little scenes made by one artist. It looked really interesting on television and we decided to give it a try. The idea the artist was going for, is that we don’t need a large world or living space to occupy, we can exist in very little space. We shouldn’t be using huge spaces as individuals and we don’t need lots of things.

The artist built a small travel trailer that had the necessities we actually need to exist all in a space measuring about 8x10 feet. I agree that we don’t need mansions, but please…I don’t want my commode in the shower either!

There is definitely a valid point in noting that we need less stuff, and less stuff leads to less space needed. This all got me thinking about small gardens.

You can have a garden in almost no space at all. Many people have container gardens that sit on tables or patios due to lack of ground to till and use. Many plants come in miniatures. One of my favorites are miniature hostas. They have some really cute names, too, like cat and mouse; mouse ears—which look like tiny mouse ears; and a yellow saw leaf miniature called dragon tales.

Not all nurseries carry the miniature hostas. In order to find a good variety I would recommend searching on-line mail order nurseries. Mail order nurseries not only show a nice picture of a mature plant, but usually ship just before planting time and send directions on where and how to plant. I like a lot of different sites, but for hard to find plants I like waysidegardens.com.

There are also some beautiful miniature roses, and I have found them to be a lot more hardy than my large ever bloomers or heritage roses. I am by no means an expert or master gardener, all my knowledge comes from trial and error, reading, or seminars. I do know that Japanese beetles leave miniature roses alone, but will strip a large traditional rose of everything but stems. I know this because I’ve experienced it. The miniatures must taste awful because they won’t touch them. Not much messes with the miniature hostas either, unless you put them in the sun. So, like the artist at the museum, you can have a little garden if you so desire.

I love a tomato plant on the back porch, where I can just grab a few tomatoes for a salad. I’m not sure I could function in an 8x10 living space, but I do know there wouldn’t be a chance of it working if a little outdoor space wasn’t included. To be honest, our recycling bins take up more space than the entire trailer.

If you get the chance to go see “Small Worlds” its free and worth the drive. There are four artists featured and all are good in their own ways. One actually makes little miniature artist studios of actual artists; another makes miniatures and photographs them to look life-size; and another drew pictures of small homes in the Toledo area, starting with homes in poverty stricken areas and progressing to working middle class homes. It was all well done. The museum always comes through with interesting programs that make us think outside the box as well as all around and through the box. It’s that way in the garden, too.

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