Gardener's Grapevine 2012.02.22

Written by David Green.

On Saturdays I try to spend time at my grandmother’s house quilting. We make a quilt for our church Christmas bazaar in December, which is a yearly event. It takes a long time to sew an entire quilt, and can take months or even the entire year to complete. A lot of the time it’s Gram, my Aunt Patricia Houttieker and myself sitting around the frame sewing.  Three generations talking and sewing like in times of old. 

I reap so much of the past from these sessions like family history, ideas about all sorts of things, and lots of personal opinions. Personal opinions always make me laugh later when I think back on them. What one person thinks, another may not, and we are much more open in our current era about what we think than people were in the past.

My grandmother pointed out while we were quilting, that my great-grandmother would host quilting at her home, and when her sister-in-law left she would take out her stitches and replace them with smaller tidier stitches. My opinion on this is wow, there are no quilts in our family with her sewing on them. That’s sad, but to my great-grandmother that was not an heirloom, it was a functional thing that needed to be as perfect as possible. Now those long ago beautiful quilts are coveted keepsakes that our family cherishes.

My point in all this is that in gardening we all have our opinions on what works and what will still be here in the future. For everyone, that is a different footprint we all choose to make. Most trees take generations to mature, so our vision is not in full fruition until many years down the road, when future owners of the property may wonder why in the world anyone would put a tree there and cut it down. Or they may cherish it and nurture it. It all depends on opinion and outlook. This spring, take a look around and think of who put what in your yard and why. Do you like their vision?

To continue with starting your plants indoors, plants started indoors have never been exposed to the ever-changing harsh environment of the outdoors. While the weather may seem fine to you, to a new seedling it is like throwing a newborn to the elements. It may or may not make it. 

To insure a healthy plant, take your plants outside in the warmth of the afternoon and put them in the shade away from the wind. Bring them back inside prior to the temperature changing for the evening. Leave them out there for a few hours longer each day, gradually exposing them to a little more sunshine until they are okay in complete sunshine. This process usually takes about two weeks and the plants are ready to be transplanted to their permanent living space in your garden. If freezing temperatures are forecast, continue the process until the threat of frost is gone. 

When transplanting seedlings potted in organic containers, cut the top of the container down to soil level to prevent the air from drying the container out and wicking all the moisture away from the seedling. Also, cut or punch small holes in the bottom of the container so the roots can grow outward. Sometimes these containers don’t completely break down and can inhibit root growth, so the holes help the roots grow naturally. If you use toilet paper rolls there won’t be a bottom, so the roots will be free to grow at will.  

There is no greater thrill than seeing your plants succeed. My uncle is currently growing a bean plant in his kitchen that has two blooms already. Obviously, you can be successful. Go for it, and inexpensive food is yours for the picking.

  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
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    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
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    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

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