Gardener's Grapevine 2012.02.22

Written by David Green.

On Saturdays I try to spend time at my grandmother’s house quilting. We make a quilt for our church Christmas bazaar in December, which is a yearly event. It takes a long time to sew an entire quilt, and can take months or even the entire year to complete. A lot of the time it’s Gram, my Aunt Patricia Houttieker and myself sitting around the frame sewing.  Three generations talking and sewing like in times of old. 

I reap so much of the past from these sessions like family history, ideas about all sorts of things, and lots of personal opinions. Personal opinions always make me laugh later when I think back on them. What one person thinks, another may not, and we are much more open in our current era about what we think than people were in the past.

My grandmother pointed out while we were quilting, that my great-grandmother would host quilting at her home, and when her sister-in-law left she would take out her stitches and replace them with smaller tidier stitches. My opinion on this is wow, there are no quilts in our family with her sewing on them. That’s sad, but to my great-grandmother that was not an heirloom, it was a functional thing that needed to be as perfect as possible. Now those long ago beautiful quilts are coveted keepsakes that our family cherishes.

My point in all this is that in gardening we all have our opinions on what works and what will still be here in the future. For everyone, that is a different footprint we all choose to make. Most trees take generations to mature, so our vision is not in full fruition until many years down the road, when future owners of the property may wonder why in the world anyone would put a tree there and cut it down. Or they may cherish it and nurture it. It all depends on opinion and outlook. This spring, take a look around and think of who put what in your yard and why. Do you like their vision?

To continue with starting your plants indoors, plants started indoors have never been exposed to the ever-changing harsh environment of the outdoors. While the weather may seem fine to you, to a new seedling it is like throwing a newborn to the elements. It may or may not make it. 

To insure a healthy plant, take your plants outside in the warmth of the afternoon and put them in the shade away from the wind. Bring them back inside prior to the temperature changing for the evening. Leave them out there for a few hours longer each day, gradually exposing them to a little more sunshine until they are okay in complete sunshine. This process usually takes about two weeks and the plants are ready to be transplanted to their permanent living space in your garden. If freezing temperatures are forecast, continue the process until the threat of frost is gone. 

When transplanting seedlings potted in organic containers, cut the top of the container down to soil level to prevent the air from drying the container out and wicking all the moisture away from the seedling. Also, cut or punch small holes in the bottom of the container so the roots can grow outward. Sometimes these containers don’t completely break down and can inhibit root growth, so the holes help the roots grow naturally. If you use toilet paper rolls there won’t be a bottom, so the roots will be free to grow at will.  

There is no greater thrill than seeing your plants succeed. My uncle is currently growing a bean plant in his kitchen that has two blooms already. Obviously, you can be successful. Go for it, and inexpensive food is yours for the picking.

  • Front.bridge Cross
    STEP BY STEP—Wyatt Stevens of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge Sunday during the Michigan DNR’s Great Outdoors Jamboree at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The Tecumseh Boy Scout Troop constructed the bridge again this year after taking a break in 2016. The Jamboree offered a variety of activities for a wide range of age groups. Morenci’s Stair District Library set up activities again this year and had visits with dozens of kids. See the back page for additional photos.
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    LEADING THE WAY—The Morenci Area High School marching band led the way across the pedestrian bridge on Morenci’s south side for the annual Labor Day Bridge Walk. The Band Boosters shared profits from the sale of T-shirts with the walk’s sponsor, the Morenci Area Chamber of Commerce. Additional photos are on the back page.
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    LOOKING UP—More than 200 people showed up at Stair District Library Monday afternoon to view the big celestial event with free glasses provided by a grant from the Space Science Institute. The library offered craft activities from noon to 1 p.m., refreshments including Cosmic Cake from Zingerman’s Bakehouse and a live viewing of the eclipse from NASA on a large screen. As the sky darkened slightly, more and more people moved outside to the sidewalk to take a look at the shrinking sun. If you missed it, hang on for the next total eclipse in 2024 as the path comes even closer to this area.
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    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
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    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
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    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
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