Gardener's Grapevine 2012.02.22

Written by David Green.

On Saturdays I try to spend time at my grandmother’s house quilting. We make a quilt for our church Christmas bazaar in December, which is a yearly event. It takes a long time to sew an entire quilt, and can take months or even the entire year to complete. A lot of the time it’s Gram, my Aunt Patricia Houttieker and myself sitting around the frame sewing.  Three generations talking and sewing like in times of old. 

I reap so much of the past from these sessions like family history, ideas about all sorts of things, and lots of personal opinions. Personal opinions always make me laugh later when I think back on them. What one person thinks, another may not, and we are much more open in our current era about what we think than people were in the past.

My grandmother pointed out while we were quilting, that my great-grandmother would host quilting at her home, and when her sister-in-law left she would take out her stitches and replace them with smaller tidier stitches. My opinion on this is wow, there are no quilts in our family with her sewing on them. That’s sad, but to my great-grandmother that was not an heirloom, it was a functional thing that needed to be as perfect as possible. Now those long ago beautiful quilts are coveted keepsakes that our family cherishes.

My point in all this is that in gardening we all have our opinions on what works and what will still be here in the future. For everyone, that is a different footprint we all choose to make. Most trees take generations to mature, so our vision is not in full fruition until many years down the road, when future owners of the property may wonder why in the world anyone would put a tree there and cut it down. Or they may cherish it and nurture it. It all depends on opinion and outlook. This spring, take a look around and think of who put what in your yard and why. Do you like their vision?

To continue with starting your plants indoors, plants started indoors have never been exposed to the ever-changing harsh environment of the outdoors. While the weather may seem fine to you, to a new seedling it is like throwing a newborn to the elements. It may or may not make it. 

To insure a healthy plant, take your plants outside in the warmth of the afternoon and put them in the shade away from the wind. Bring them back inside prior to the temperature changing for the evening. Leave them out there for a few hours longer each day, gradually exposing them to a little more sunshine until they are okay in complete sunshine. This process usually takes about two weeks and the plants are ready to be transplanted to their permanent living space in your garden. If freezing temperatures are forecast, continue the process until the threat of frost is gone. 

When transplanting seedlings potted in organic containers, cut the top of the container down to soil level to prevent the air from drying the container out and wicking all the moisture away from the seedling. Also, cut or punch small holes in the bottom of the container so the roots can grow outward. Sometimes these containers don’t completely break down and can inhibit root growth, so the holes help the roots grow naturally. If you use toilet paper rolls there won’t be a bottom, so the roots will be free to grow at will.  

There is no greater thrill than seeing your plants succeed. My uncle is currently growing a bean plant in his kitchen that has two blooms already. Obviously, you can be successful. Go for it, and inexpensive food is yours for the picking.

  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
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    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Girls.on.ride
    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
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    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
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    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
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    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
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    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
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    BEVY OF BALLS—Stair District Library Summer Reading Program VolunTeens, including Libby Rorick, back left and Ty Kruse, back right, threw a dozen inflatable soccer balls into the crowd during a reading of “Sergio Saves the Game.” The sports-themed program continues on Wednesdays through July 27.
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