Gardener's Grapevine 2012.01.18

Written by David Green.

Sunday afternoon is my time to “chill” with the computer and a cup of hot tea and write this article. Sometimes life just is so peaceful. I say this as I watch our big orange tabby cat, Crankshaft, chase a squirrel across the side yard.

This cat is not aware that the squirrel is not going to be all that fun if he catches him. Squirrels bite, and extremely hard; they’re not animals that enjoy being messed with. My dad’s King Charles spaniel, Cooper, is not aware of this either and he spends his days looking out the window guarding the house from the dreaded squirrels. It makes me laugh to think of the big surprise both of these animals would get if a squirrel decided to turn the table.

I was doing some reading yesterday and came across an article in Country Living about the Farmers Almanac. I remember seeing the almanac in the home of my great-grandparents, Hila and Estel Elderdge, as a young child. I never took the time to read it though. Then one Christmas I was looking for an extra gift for my uncle Dwight Houttieker and my aunt said get him the Farmers Almanac. As I stood in line to pay for it, I glanced through this small piece of literature.

It appears more magazine than book, yet reads like an informative book. It is really quite fascinating and usually the predictions are right. Apparently farmers had been following this book for years with success.

The article I read had some interesting tidbits I thought I would share: 

The almanac was first published during George Washington’s administration. It was used by Abraham Lincoln to discount a witness in an 1858 murder trial. The hole in the upper left corner of each copy was originally intended to hang the book up in the “outhouse.” During WWII the FBI discovered the Farmers Almanac in a German spy’s coat pocket. It has only had 13 editors over the years. A printing mix up in July 1816 had a snow prediction, and strangely enough it actually did snow that summer.

This little book is really fun reading for a gardener and most times it is on the money with predictions. It is available at most places selling a big selection of magazines, and is reasonably priced at $5.99.

Saturday morning I went up to our beautiful library to pick up my weekly  books on CD. I have discovered the world of interlibrary loans—I can request my favorite authors and soon they are there. What a great thing and I can use it right at home. When you drive an hour to and from work every day, recorded books are gifts straight from the big guy himself. 

While I was there I started doing some more research on when this column started and what it was like then. I liked the newspaper back then; it was so personal. Maybe because I knew a lot of the people or just the way it was put together. It seemed like a great big Christmas letter. Who married who in extreme detail; who visited who; who was in the hospital and released.

The articles written by Maude Chase really grab me. Either the lady had a mind like a computer or she kept some very detailed notebooks. I read every one of her articles and it’s why it’s taking me forever to get any information on the Grapevine article.

I did run across some interesting ads. The A&P grocery store had lettuce for ten cents a head January 7, 1960. The seed costs more than that now. Cauliflower was twenty-nine cents a head and navel oranges were forty-nine cents a dozen. Wow! How about two loaves of white bread for thirty-five cents or eggs for thirty-seven cents a dozen? Consumers Power ran an ad that said “what works 24 hours a day nonstop for twenty cents a day?” That’s how much electricity cost then. What a huge difference 52 years can make.

  • Play Practice
    DRAMA—Fayette schools, in conjunction with the Opera House Theater program, will present two plays Friday night at the Fayette Opera House. From the left is Autumn Black, Wyatt Mitchell, Elizabeth Myers, Jonah Perdue, Sam Myers (in the back) and Lauren Dale. Other cast members are Brynn Balmer, Mason Maginn, Ashtyn Dominique, Stephanie Munguia and Sierra Munguia. Jason Stuckey serves as the technician and Trinity Leady is the backstage manager. The plays will be performed during the day Friday for students and for the public at 7 p.m. Friday.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rover
    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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