The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Gardener's Grapevine 2012.01.04

Written by David Green.

Happy New Year! The key word is new. With the holidays past, many of you have a poinsettia plant sitting there looking less than fresh. What to do? Well, I work with a doctor who keeps her poinsettias year after year, and yes, they bloom, but they are not the lush greenhouse plant they started as.

Prior to Christmas she and I were discussing poinsettias and their survival, and also how neither of us can stand to throw away another living thing. This is exactly why I never want a poinsettia during the holidays—they are beautiful, yet the dilemma begins after the holidays about what to do with the less-than-attractive, not dead plant. With that said, I did a little reading on this symbol of the holidays.

Here are some facts: The plant is a native of Mexico; it’s a perennial capable of growing up to ten-feet tall. The showy colored parts most people consider the flower is actually the plant’s bracts (a modified plant leaf associated with the plants reproductive system). The true flowers of the plant are the center of the bracts. Commercial poinsettias are priced on the number of “blooms” (bract clusters). The plant is not poisonous, but the sap can be irritating to the skin and give an upset stomach if consumed in large enough quantities. They are grown in all 50 states, there are more than 100 varieties, and 85 percent of all Christmas plants purchased are poinsettias.

Here are some pointers for caring for a poinsettia: When picking out a plant, make sure it is wrapped very well, as exposure to low temperatures for even a minimal time can stress the plant and shorten its life and leaf show. Set the plant in indirect light—they need six hours of light each day—and do not let it touch a window. It should be kept at a temperature of 60 to 70 degrees in daytime and 55 degrees at night.

The soil should be well drained. Punch holes in the foil and set it on a saucer to drain the excess water. Let the soil dry before watering; they do not like to be wet for long periods and a wet plant will drop its bracts faster.

To keep that plant going until next Christmas, it needs to be in a room with curtain filtered light and the soil must be allowed to go dry to the touch and watered only sparingly. In the winter months it will not grow, as this is its dormant stage and fertilizer uptake will be minimal.

After temperatures reach 50 degrees, the plant can be kept outside. Start it out in the shade for two weeks then move to part sun for two weeks then into full or partial sun. Do not put the plant in direct hot sunlight, as it will scorch the leaves. At this point the plant is in a weakened state and needs to be protected. It needs fertilized every fifth watering with houseplant, poinsettia or evergreen fertilizer to encourage growth. 

In the fall, bring the plant inside and begin the process of forming bracts. This process can take two months or longer. Change to a nitrogen based fertilizer, one for poinsettias is best, and reduce the amount of fertilizer to half of what you have been using.

Begin the process of long nights and short days—13 hours of pure darkness (this means uninterrupted darkness, not even a street lamp in the distance can be present) and 11 hours of sunlight. After two months, this pattern can be stopped, fertilizer decreased and the plant placed in the sunniest window in the house. Don’t over-water it.

If you have a notion to do this, I wish you the best of luck and I stand by my desire to not have these beautiful plants in my home, as I would never be able to do all this with my work schedule.

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