Gardener's Grapevine 2011.12.28

Written by David Green.

Christmas has past and as I clean up the mess from a large family meal and gift exchange free-for-all, I realize how much post holiday waste is generated.

I have noted before that I am not an over-the-top “green” person, but I am environmentally conscious about my carbon footprint. If it is within our ability to reduce, recycle and reuse, shouldn’t we?

I read this week that not all wrapping paper can be recycled because it’s coated in plastic to make the iridescent patterns and colors. My daughter did point out that it usually says on the paper products if it is recyclable.

The reason I am into recycling is because in order to keep our water supply and soils uncontaminated so we can continue to garden, we have to be conscious of what is happening beyond our own little plot of land. I know of people who will dump anything down the sewer drain just to dispose of it. Does it ever occur to them where that goes? Gas, grease, oil, etc…where do they think this goes?  Is it out of sight, out of mind?

Well, with all this thought of recycling comes thoughts of my terrific husband of 26 years lugging a trunk load of paper and cardboard up to the recycling center. Having to work after Christmas does have it’s advantages when everyone else is at home.

My uncle Dwight Houttieker loves the outdoors and particularly gardening. For Christmas he received some great gardening books and spent a lot of his holiday learning new techniques to use in his garden. Gardening books are a great present and they keep on giving long after the holiday. We had a great conversation about greenhouse gardening and the different ways we’ve seen to start your garden early using temporary green housing techniques such as PVC pipes bent to shape a support and heavy plastic sheeting to cover the supports.

It is always nice to talk with other gardeners, especially if they are avid readers. You get ideas and information that you never thought of before. A friend from northern Michigan told me they start plants early using milk jugs. They cut the bottom out of them and put them over the plants while they are small. As the weather warms they gradually take the caps off, then cut the top of the jug off leaving the base as support for the plant. They have had extremely good success with this technique and due to an extended growing season they have more produce.

My aunt and uncle have a lovely enclosed porch they don’t use in the winter and my uncle is going to try using it as a greenhouse to start his plants early. He told me that he has so much more time since retiring and so many ideas on improving his garden. Maybe that is what I need to do…retire.

Unfortunately, gardening takes money to purchase what I need and I’m not old enough for Social Security. Life is so not fair! Guess I’ll keep dreaming of a day when I have unlimited time to play in the dirt. Until then, I will keep reading and picking other gardeners’ brains for ideas.

  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.grieders
    ONE-TWO PUNCH—Morenci’s Griffin Grieder saved his best for last, running his fastest time ever in the 110-meter high hurdles at the state finals Saturday in Grand Rapids to finish first in the state in Div. IV. His brother Luke, a junior (right), claimed the state runner-up spot. Bulldog junior Bailee Dominique placed seventh in the 100-meter dash.
  • Front.sidewalk
    MORENCI senior class president Mikayla Price leads the way Sunday afternoon from the Church of the Nazarene to the United Methodist Church for the baccalaureate ceremony. Later in the day, 39 members of the senior class received diplomas in the high school gymnasium.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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