Gardener's Grapevine 2011.11.30

Written by David Green.

This past weekend seemed to go by in a flash. Any time there is a holiday it seems like the days go twice as fast. Seems like the seasons are that way, also. We get so excited at the prospect of warmer weather, but not many people get as excited about cold weather. My son is about the only one I know who loves winter, and that is due to his love of snow boarding.

Most people prepare their outside for cold weather by putting away lawn furniture and toys and winterizing mowers and travel trailers. If they are not gardeners, not a thought is given to the lawn. Winterizing the lawn is one of the best things you can do to ensure a nice healthy lawn in the spring. A good fertilizer is the most important thing that can be done. A winterizing fertilizer must be high in potassium to ensure extensive root and rhizome growth. In most of the northern states October is the latest to fertilize, as anything beyond that will encourage growth too late into the season and kill off the lawn when hard freezes come.

A lawn needs to go dormant to be healthy. Aerating the lawn in the fall opens it up for spring growth. Lawns tend to get compacted during the summer from being walked on. Aeration opens up the ground to encourage new healthy growth. Aeration can be done anytime prior to a hard freeze. It is best done like golf courses do with an aerator that pops plugs out onto the soil. There are some more reasonably priced aerators, that punch holes in the lawn, and while not perfect, they do a decent job.

I saw a very pretty ornament for holiday decorating that was very simple. Take a clear ornament and slide the top of a peacock feather inside it, cut the extra off and recap the ornament. It was a beautiful idea and stayed with the nature theme. I love peacock feathers, but they are very costly to purchase and I don’t frequently run across them for sale. Many people shy away from raising them because they are an extremely noisy bird and not very nice in personality. They drop some of the most beautiful feathers you will ever see in nature.

I also saw another natural decoration—rose hips strung and dried—that has a long-ago origin. Rose hips turn black and get extremely hard when dried. In the past, dried rose hips have been used for beads in necklaces and bracelets. It is interesting how natural items have been used through the decades and still are today.

This past weekend we went to the Christmas tree farm and picked out our tree for the holidays. I love the smell of fresh evergreen in the house. It is so very fresh and pleasant. It’s easy to see why people love to hang evergreen wreaths and roping. I love wreaths made with evergreen and herbs, they smell like a gardener’s dream.

It is not hard to make a fresh wreath and the benefits are awesome. A wreath made completely out of herbs will last for months and can be used to cook with. This type of wreath makes a great gift for the nature lover or cook on your list. Nature can really be a lot of fun for gifts and decorating.

  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.snake
    Lannis Smith of the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor shows off a python last week at Stair District Library's Summer Reading Program.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.rock Study
    ROCKHOUNDS—From the left, Joseph McCullough, Sean Pagett and Jonathan McCullough peer through hand lenses to study rocks. The project is part of Morenci Elementary School’s summer camp that continues into August.

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