Gardener's Grapevine 2011.09.14

Written by David Green.

Saturday is almost always clean-up day at our house. Even with the kids gone, there is still a lot of work to do. Owning an old house is constant work and the upkeep never ends. Anyone who admires a well-maintained older home needs to realize the crazy amount of time involved. Add to that my love of gardens, and Saturday becomes a day packed with chores.

This week I spent the majority of the day in the yard cleaning up for fall and assessing the plants that are going to need to lose a little of themselves. Most of our garden flowers are perennials. I can’t see the sense in planting too many annuals, as they are temperamental and only last one growing season.

I like to edge everything in the fall. It cuts the grass’s root system back from the edge of the bed and the winter seems to stunt it. When I edge in the spring it seems like the grass is in full bore growing mode and it grows right back.

We harvested all the sweet corn last weekend. Hopefully I will get the corn shocks gathered up for fall decorating this week.

I spent quite a bit of time pruning the low growing sucker branches from the crabtrees. I still need to pull the grass back from the toe of the trees. A friend of mine from church who is a landscape architect teacher instructed me on the care of trees. She told me a tree breathes from its toes as well as the rest of it, and if you allow the toes to get covered with anything it is not good for the tree and can actually kill it eventually. It’s a slow process, but will eventually happen.

The toes of the tree are the exposed roots at the base. Some people like to mulch around the base of their trees for aesthetic purposes. When mulching, it should be kept back from the tree’s base. I have been guilty of packing mulch and flowers in under the big trees out front until I learned this bit of information. I didn’t quite make it to the pulling of the sod back from the tree’s base phase of my clean up, but there’s always next Saturday.

We had a little peach tree in our side yard that produced the most miserable peaches imaginable. Art brought it home from somewhere, priced as a bargain. Well, you get what you pay for and even the squirrels weren’t impressed. The fruit was all pit with very little meat. The squirrels would pick one, take a bite and throw it on the ground. I felt much the same the first season when we tried them. 

Art loves trees and he kept pushing me not to take the peach tree down. I, on the other hand, feel that all plants have a job and if they are failing it’s time to move on. The tree met it’s end with my dad’s chain saw on Saturday afternoon and I’m not sad at all.

Next year a beautiful tree will be planted with nice big fat fruit in the fall, I hope! Our bonus is that we got some very nice sized logs to chip up and use in the meat smoker and burn in our wood fired pizza oven. Fruit wood has such a yummy flavor. Everything has a use, it’s just not always the originally planned use. 

  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.grieders
    ONE-TWO PUNCH—Morenci’s Griffin Grieder saved his best for last, running his fastest time ever in the 110-meter high hurdles at the state finals Saturday in Grand Rapids to finish first in the state in Div. IV. His brother Luke, a junior (right), claimed the state runner-up spot. Bulldog junior Bailee Dominique placed seventh in the 100-meter dash.
  • Front.sidewalk
    MORENCI senior class president Mikayla Price leads the way Sunday afternoon from the Church of the Nazarene to the United Methodist Church for the baccalaureate ceremony. Later in the day, 39 members of the senior class received diplomas in the high school gymnasium.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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