Gardener's Grapevine 2011.08.24

Written by David Green.

What a beautiful August day Sunday turned out to be. We attended a birthday party picnic for my four year-old-cousin and it was just the right temperature, and except for a few sprinkles, it was sunny. 

My son returns to Michigan State University this week to begin his sophomore year of college—two down and six years to go. Both of my children are outdoors type people and huge animal lovers. My son is studying animal sciences and my daughter works on an Arabian race horse breeding farm between Tecumseh and Britton. She is literally outside most of the day and then plants a vegetable and flower garden, too. 

My son loves outdoor sports and working with the MSU animals. If it were up to these two, Art and I would have every animal on the earth as a pet.

Pets are wonderful. They lighten our mood and actually make depressed, handicapped, or ill people feel better. Animals can make our homes safer, warn us of danger, and even attack a person wishing to cause us problems.

There are dogs that are specially trained to detect health problems in their owners. Some dogs can tell when their caregiver is going to have a seizure. Pets can also cause some major problems in a garden also.

Animal urine can kill a plant or bush. Animals love to lie in tall plants to “hide,” it gives them a sense of security supposedly. If they lie in the wrong weeds it can give you a case of the itches! Noxious weeds seldom affect animals because of their fur, but poison ivy oil can sit on their fur and transfer to your skin. There is  nothing like a blistery itchy rash for making life pleasant.

Another great thing pets do is teach each other not so great habits. We raised golden retrievers for years and just like in human relationships our retrievers had their set personalities. Our female, Ginger, was sweet tempered and laid back and rarely got into mischief. Our male, Simon, got into all kinds of mischief and smiled at you when he was caught. Yes, I said smile. He had a crazy love of tomatoes and would strip our cherry tomato plant bare. We eventually gave up and planted one for him so we could have some of our own.

Some of Simon’s other little tricks were opening gate latches and doors and eating appliance knobs and things like Borax bleach and rat poison. (Believe it or not he lived through that! Thanks, Dr. Sell.)

Well, Simon and Ginger are in dog heaven, but they left our lab to carry on. Simon taught her all about tomatoes and she doesn’t care what kind they are. I can’t really blame her for her tomato fondness, as a homegrown tomato is really high on my weakness list, too.

  • Front.splash
    Water Fun—Carter Seitz and Colson Walter take a fast trip along a plastic sliding strip while water from a sprinkler provides the lubrication. The boys took a break from tie-dyeing last week at Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program to cool off in the water.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

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