Gardener's Grapevine 2011.07.27

Written by David Green.

This past Saturday, my husband Art, Sandy Cahill, and I went to the Ann Arbor Art Fair for the afternoon. Every direction you looked, someone was selling something and it was definitely a sensory overload. Art comes in so many forms and mediums.

If you have never been to the Art Fair it is worth the drive and time—the only cost is getting there and parking, beyond that it is at your discretion to spend or not. There are so many directions to go and none of them are bad; the entire place has artists in every nook and cranny. This leads me to a topic of interest in the garden—points of interest.

Some people use statuary to enhance their garden, others use whimsical art pieces, and some use wooden structures. It is these little extras that seem to set gardens apart and also pique people’s interest.

I find that changing things year to year will also keep folks watching a garden. As I’ve said before, I take care of the church’s gardens and yard with some help from the church ladies. When we plant in the spring we change things year to year to keep it interesting. We have this big blocky sign in front which does a nice job of announcing services and our pastor. It stands in the middle of the yard and is very overwhelming to the landscaping, so we work to make it blend in well.

The first year we re-landscaped we used hydrangeas to enhance the garden and a giant planter to draw attention to the message. This year we moved the planter over quite a bit and added two Adirondack chairs on either side of the pot, which gave a very welcoming look.

When choosing garden adornments or enhancements it is always wise to think of what you are trying to emphasize. If you add too much or a hodgepodge it confuses the observer as he tries to take it all in.

Last year a friend and I visited Meijer Gardens when the Chihuly exhibit was there. Dale Chihuly is a famous glass blowing artist who resides in Venice, Italy. His work was very tastefully placed in the gardens and blended well, as it was spread out across acres of gardens. If they had grouped it all in one place, the observer would never have been able to appreciate it all.

As with decorating the inside of a home or business takes direction, so in many ways does a garden. On the other hand, sometimes the little unexpected surprises, like the flowers that the birds plant, are just the right thing. Who’s to say what’s right, wrong or too much? It’s your garden, do it your way and change it next year when the ideas move you in another direction. Gardens are for fun and relaxation, and the food benefits are pretty good also.

  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2017