Gardener's Grapevine 2011.07.07

Written by David Green.

“Knee high by the fourth of July” ring a bell with anyone? It’s an old saying that supposedly means if the corn is knee high by the fourth of July it will be a good crop. 

Traveling back and forth to Maumee every day I see lots of fields and gardens. Around Assumption the crops are really excelling. I see wheat fields that are so beautiful and have really full heads. There is something so peaceful about the golden wheat waiving in the breeze and watching it ripple in the sunlight. I go to work as the sun is rising and it throws multiple shades of yellow and gold across the field—a very beautiful thing to see first thing in the morning.

It amazes me how a simple seed with very little assistance becomes a plant, and even without a flower can be a glorious site. Plants are very resilient and can grow in the strangest places.

My friend Mary Johnson has a columbine that grows every year in a crack in the concrete on her back patio. There is no nourishment other than what is in the crack and no water except the rain, yet a two foot hardy plant grows not just one year, but every year! It flowers just as beautiful as any other columbines in the gardens.

Nature is all around us and so many people just fly by without ever seeing most of it. Last week Art and I were driving home in the evening down Gorham Street and in the fields behind the houses on the east side were two sets of deer. The first set appeared to be two does grazing and they looked so regal standing in the field. Just outside the city limits, way back towards the woods, were a doe and her twin fawns grazing.

If you drive the speed limit or over in life you miss the fawns grazing, the morning wheat waving in the sunlight, and the oriole sitting on the roadside wildflowers.

Have you ever sat on the porch in your own yard and just done nothing but listen to whatever is there? Sure, there is going to be “commercial” noise such as automobiles and the noise of daily life, but there are lots of different birds each with their own individual calls, bees working, squirrels being squirrelly, sometimes a tree creaking. 

When I add to my gardens, I think about what will utilize what I add. Certain things are attracted to certain plants and objects. Next week I will talk about what attracts what in the garden.

  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.snake
    Lannis Smith of the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor shows off a python last week at Stair District Library's Summer Reading Program.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rock Study
    ROCKHOUNDS—From the left, Joseph McCullough, Sean Pagett and Jonathan McCullough peer through hand lenses to study rocks. The project is part of Morenci Elementary School’s summer camp that continues into August.

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