Gardener's Grapevine 2011.06.08

Written by David Green.

Last weekend we traveled to Cincinnati for our nephew’s graduation. One nephew graduated from high school and his brother from college. Graduation always makes me think of the progression of time. When you think of 10 or 20 years it seems like forever, but when it’s over it seemed to fly by. This is something that is of extreme importance when planning gardens, yards, or even choosing a tree. 

Some trees are so slow growing that if you need shade you may be dead before it matures. Oaks are beautiful, there is a fabulous specimen in front of Eric and Mary Johnson’s home. It has to be well over 100 years old. It would take two people holding hands to encircle it. Last weekend many beautiful old trees were destroyed in our town. There were two trees that fell across from the church that had to be around 100 years old. It left a very bare area with no shade to the home there at all.

Another example of longevity is at the cemetery. It is so beautiful with the long trunks of the oaks and maples towering over our loved ones. I enjoy walking the cemetery paths and wondering about who these people were and what they contributed to our community.

A property can only support so many trees and keep them healthy to reach their full potential. Many people plant trees in their yard without looking to the future to plan out where it will be when it’s mature. This is why you see trees and bushes that are too tight to the house. The roots and branches can cause some major damage to foundations and siding. What may seem appropriate when a tree is in its infancy can be wrong in the mature state. 

When picking a tree or bush you must consider many of the same things that you consider when choosing flowers. Location, mature width and height, if it flowers or not, which zone it will grow in, how much sunlight it needs, if it is a fruit tree will it produce what you desire or be nonbearing, and how fast it grows and need to be considered.

Some people plant fast growing trees to provide shade, which is great except they tend to be willowy and get damaged easily in storms. It is usually a good idea to mix both so when the rapid growers  come apart in a storm, the slower growers are mature and can take their place.

Have you ever notice how people tend to purchase a home and tear out the landscaping not long after? This is usually due to a desire for a cleaner and fresher look, or if the landscaping is overgrown and removal is the only answer. Mature landscaping can make a property look distinguished if a good plan has been followed. Unfortunately, most owners don’t think of what it will look like in 20 years.

Trees and bushes give so much to our environment and are well worth the effort. When you see a tree felled in a storm it should make you sad; it took years to mature and will take years to replace. Plant a tree…just put it away from your home.

  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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