Gardener's Grapevine 2011.05.18

Written by David Green.

By JO ERBSKORN

I think gardeners are born with a love for dirt and plants. Some people can’t stand dirt on their hands or clothing. I am like “Pig Pen” in the Peanuts cartoon strip. When I’m in the garden it is with a plan and dirt be damned, I’m going to get that plan accomplished. Apparently one other member of our family has my philosophy.

Saturday we had our annual spring planting and spruce up day at the Congregational church. Because of the rain we were in short supply of help, so my aunt brought her granddaughter Chloe along, who is a freshman in high school. Most everyone knows that teenagers and work are not always a good combination, but wow, what a work horse she was and she never had one discouraging word. She said she liked to get dirty and I knew she had the heart of a gardener. The next generation of dirt lovers has arrived.

I would like to discuss container flowers for the “wow” factor. The first thing is to look at what you have, meaning where the planters will sit and what are they emphasizing. Next, look at what colors will be around them. Color is very important and to get that desired “pop,” you need to step back and think about the surroundings. Finally, think about the amount of sunlight available to the area the plants will sit in. “Sun” means full-on sun all day, “part sun” means part of the day they are in sun and part they are not, and “shade” is little to no sun.

I will use my own house porches as an example. My home is shades of grey and white with cranberry accents. Our porches are deep, making them more partial sun to shade depending on how far back the containers are on the porch. Whites, blues and pale colored flowers will not be a good choice in my containers as these are the colors that make up grey, and they will wash right into the house and not be noticed. If a certain plant in these shades is used, it should be as an accent to a bright flower such as a red or bright pink.

You need to think of the height of the plant, how wide it will be at full growth and whether it will drape down. Most containers of flowers have a tall plant in the center, medium height plants around the tall one, and small draping or non-draping plants on the outer ring. If the container is against a wall you can put the tall plant at the back, the medium plant in front, and smaller ones in front of that.

Use one type of plant with vivid, almost “jump at you” color, and use the rest of the plants to back up this plant. On my porch, red or bright pink is best for the “jump at you” plant, and white and yellow with a splash of deep purple here and there is a great combination. If my home were yellow and white, purples and reds could be the emphasis color.

Use a soil that retains moisture and contains fertilizer in your pot and save some time and work. Have fun with color, height and texture; if it doesn’t work, try something different next year. We live in Michigan and an annual is just that, an annual.

  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016