Gardener's Grapevine 2011.05.18

Written by David Green.

By JO ERBSKORN

I think gardeners are born with a love for dirt and plants. Some people can’t stand dirt on their hands or clothing. I am like “Pig Pen” in the Peanuts cartoon strip. When I’m in the garden it is with a plan and dirt be damned, I’m going to get that plan accomplished. Apparently one other member of our family has my philosophy.

Saturday we had our annual spring planting and spruce up day at the Congregational church. Because of the rain we were in short supply of help, so my aunt brought her granddaughter Chloe along, who is a freshman in high school. Most everyone knows that teenagers and work are not always a good combination, but wow, what a work horse she was and she never had one discouraging word. She said she liked to get dirty and I knew she had the heart of a gardener. The next generation of dirt lovers has arrived.

I would like to discuss container flowers for the “wow” factor. The first thing is to look at what you have, meaning where the planters will sit and what are they emphasizing. Next, look at what colors will be around them. Color is very important and to get that desired “pop,” you need to step back and think about the surroundings. Finally, think about the amount of sunlight available to the area the plants will sit in. “Sun” means full-on sun all day, “part sun” means part of the day they are in sun and part they are not, and “shade” is little to no sun.

I will use my own house porches as an example. My home is shades of grey and white with cranberry accents. Our porches are deep, making them more partial sun to shade depending on how far back the containers are on the porch. Whites, blues and pale colored flowers will not be a good choice in my containers as these are the colors that make up grey, and they will wash right into the house and not be noticed. If a certain plant in these shades is used, it should be as an accent to a bright flower such as a red or bright pink.

You need to think of the height of the plant, how wide it will be at full growth and whether it will drape down. Most containers of flowers have a tall plant in the center, medium height plants around the tall one, and small draping or non-draping plants on the outer ring. If the container is against a wall you can put the tall plant at the back, the medium plant in front, and smaller ones in front of that.

Use one type of plant with vivid, almost “jump at you” color, and use the rest of the plants to back up this plant. On my porch, red or bright pink is best for the “jump at you” plant, and white and yellow with a splash of deep purple here and there is a great combination. If my home were yellow and white, purples and reds could be the emphasis color.

Use a soil that retains moisture and contains fertilizer in your pot and save some time and work. Have fun with color, height and texture; if it doesn’t work, try something different next year. We live in Michigan and an annual is just that, an annual.

  • Homecoming Court
    HOMECOMING—One senior candidate will be chosen Morenci’s fall homecoming queen during half-time ceremonies Friday at the football field. In the back row are seniors Mikayla Price, who will be escorted by Mason Vaughn; Madison Bachman, escorted by Kiegan Merillat, and Mikayla Reinke, escorted by Griffin Grieder. Senior Ariana Roseman is absent from the photo. Her escort is Garrett Smith. In the front is sophomore Abbie White, who will be escorted by Ryder Price; junior Madysen Schmitz, escorted by Harley McCaskey and freshman Madison Keller, escorted by Jarett Cook.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

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