Gardener's Grapevine 04.20.2011

Written by David Green.

By Jo Erbskorn

This past Saturday I  went to Stair Public Library with the intention of looking up past Gardener’s Grapevine columns. What I wound up doing was reading everything else in the old Observers. Maude Chase’s column fascinated me.

I never did run across an old Grapevine column, but I found out that Oak Grove Cemetery was the site of the old Morenci Fairgrounds prior to being a cemetery. Isn’t it interesting that we as a community hosted a fair? I wonder if it even resembled fairs of our current era? History is so fascinating, especially when it is your history.

This morning as I went to church, I noticed the hyacinths are blooming. The daffodils and tulips should be open for Easter. Isn’t spring wonderful? It’s so nice to see everything that was ugly and brown green up and produce such beautiful foliage and flowers. My husband Art and I are the grounds keepers at the Congregational Church where we attend.

Morenci’s churches are all beautiful and have such rich history. I remember the Baptist church when it was where the Little People’s Place is now. Our church has a very old simplistic exterior that gives it such a country church look and we strive to keep the landscaping simple yet beautiful to enhance the beauty of the structure.

Wherever you live or any building you attend can be beautiful no matter how old or new it is. It does not have to be complicated. If your exterior is a color such as brown or grey, aim for bright colors and different shades of foliage. All one color is going to appear bland and blend in, so it will not “pop.” Reds, pinks and purples do not stand out against grey and brown without some help from yellows and whites.

The opposite goes for homes that are yellow, pale blue or other light colors. If you place pinks, whites or light blue plants here they will get lost, but throw in some red or deep purple and the whole picture changes.

My point is, every season has plants that thrive at that time of year, so when you choose plants for your beds think of color. Ask yourself what will go with the colors of the buildings and the plants already present.

An example of making landscape pop and getting the wow factor is the garden clubs hanging baskets in our downtown. The club has bought these flowers for many years now and every year we strive to find the “perfect” blend of color, longevity and environmental tolerance to give the town the most beauty for the longest amount of time. We’ve tried many different types and colors of plants. We’ve had some successes and some tries that just simply blended in with their surroundings.

We discuss this every year to great lengths, prior to voting on the choices nominated. We have some successes and some duds, and you will, too. It is impossible to have success without trying something new. I encourage you all to picture what you want to achieve this year and give it a try. Make your area have a “pop.”

  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016