The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Gardener's Grapevine 04.13.2011

Written by David Green.

By Jo Erbskorn

Hello, fellow dirt lovers. Wasn’t it a beautiful weekend? It seems the thought of spring is the thing that gets me through the awful winter months.

Let’s go back to spring clean-up and yard work from last week. Now is the time to clean up around your area, even if you live in a complex. There is always something that has blown in since fall. At our house, it is the left over leaves from the whole west end, and they seem to love our fence and flower beds. The dogs add to the winter’s accumulation, so we have shovel and bucket duty.

These tasks are so much easier before the rain and muck of spring set in and they make your living space so much more pleasant to look at. Also, in a month or so, you won’t want to be cleaning up. The fun is in the planting and playing in the dirt.

Let’s talk about hostas. They are great plants with so many benefits. They do not have to be split, but over time will get enormous. They are so easy to split when the little points are a half-inch out of the ground, but so awkward after they have leafed out. Contrary to a friend’s theory that they scream when you split them, they do not. Hosta plants will fill back in after a few years. So to prevent overgrowth and gain more plants, split them.

To split the hostas, dig around the shoots. I normally go a good six inches beyond the spikes as some are slower than others to sprout up. Use a short handled long-nose spade and get the whole plant out of the ground. Shake or knock off the dirt so you can handle it more easily.

Set the plant right-side-up and slice straight down across the entire middle, nine o’clock to three o’clock. Then slice across it twelve o’clock to six o’clock. If it’s a huge overachiever, it can be cut into small sections, or whatever size you want.

Replant one section in the old spot and find new homes for the rest. Your neighbors might want some, or I put the extras at the front curb with a sign and people stop and take them.

Hostas enjoy shade and moderate sunlight. They may do well in sun in the spring, but on burning hot mid-July days they will get leaf-burn and not look very happy or attractive.

There is a new hosta on the market that is white in the spring and turns light green in mid to late summer. It sounds interesting. I always enjoy something new in the flower beds. There are numerous types of hostas and the miniatures are a favorite of mine. There is dragon tail, which has small yellow leaves and actually resembles a dragon’s tail. I love mouse ears, which look like tiny little mouse ears. There is another miniature called cat and mouse.

When you look on-line for hybrid varieties of hostas, you quickly realize a beautiful garden can be planted with all hostas. My grandmother, Katherine Wollter, has a hosta garden by her back door. It is probably five feet by sixteen feet. We have split her hostas twice in five years and they are huge again. She planted the giant leaf varieties in multiple hues and it has a very peaceful effect.

Hostas also work well to hide yard items that can’t be moved, so hostas are usually a good pick for anyone and they take very little care.

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