The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

2007.03.21 Packing on the pounds is a real science

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

There’s a real shortage of math and science teachers in this country and a shortage of kids eager to go into math and science related professions. I don’t know why that it is. Math and science have such practical applications in the real world. Take that business about energy. You know how we learned in high school that it’s neither created or destroyed? Or is it matter they were talking about? Both? Whatever. You see examples of that law of physics all the time.

Weight loss is a prime example. People all around me are losing weight like crazy. And where do you think all those pounds go? That’s right, on my hips, thighs and stomach. I found them there again, wrapped around my abdomen in abundance, when I was trying on clothes at a resale shop this weekend.

It’s a closed system, weight loss—whenever someone loses pounds, someone gains. I don’t know what the practical applications are of that bit of physics, but I’m thinking I might have to seek out new friends and maybe even change my job given the rate of gain going on around my girth.

I suppose you can guess I wasn’t much of a physics student. I learned enough to do well on tests, but then all those facts flew out the window of my brain soon after passing the New York State Regents Exam. Science was just something to muddle through when I was in school, but now it’s getting pretty lucrative. High schoolers should wise up and get excited about math and science—there will be a payoff as early as the college years. The federal government is so worried about the shortage of students in those fields, it’s offering National SMART grants.

SMART (Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent) is a new program for junior and senior college students and it pays up to $4,000 a year for each of the third and fourth academic years. So students would have to first slug through those horrible introductory courses that turned this budding soil scientist into a social science major. The catch of course is that students have to pursue a major in physical, life, or computer sciences, engineering, technology, mathematics or a critical-need foreign language.

I don’t know what languages they’re talking about—Chinese would be among them, I’d wager—but a kid would be pretty smart to consider heading into one of those math and science fields. Just think, if there were lots of science-oriented kids studying the brain, they might be able to figure out how to get people to curtail eating and increase exercise when they see the pounds adding up on the scale and the inches on the tape measure tell them their pants aren’t going to fit today. Mathematicians could figure out how many pounds are lost and how to make sure they are gained elsewhere—across the world even—by people who could stand to use a few more pounds.

For this undisciplined lover of food, it’s going to take an educational revolution to impact my eating habits—or maybe even the powers of a magician. If science and magic combined forces, maybe they could figure out a way to make fattening food disappear when you think about eating it. I suspect it will entail employing that other law of physics called “now you see it, now you don’t.”

     March 21. 2007

 

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