The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2007.05.31 How do I love thee? Underwear's not on list

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

I e-mailed a friend recently that instead of popping over for a visit, I had to start chipping away at my mental to do list. I elaborated:  “Sometimes I don't write stuff down; I just keep on keeping on, doing the next thing. What doesn’t get done probably wasn't too high on my mental list so I don't even notice.

“When I write out a list I always end up doing lots of other stuff not on the list. Often, I write it on the list just so I have something to cross off. Other times I write out a list and then don't look at it until I should have done everything. That's the most interesting way to deal with lists. It's always funny (or puke-inducing) to see what you forgot to do.

“I have one of those lists going on right now. It's kind of a dangerous practice, especially because this is the list of things I need to do before leaving for Kentucky. It's kind of like not looking at your horoscope until the next day to see how accurate it was. I have to admit that this practice usually happens when I just plain lose the list.”

I never did find the list before leaving for Kentucky to attend Rozee’s boyfriend Taylor’s graduation from Berea College. But I did remember to do something that I think was on the bottom of the list, things to do in Berea, the arts and craft capitol of Kentucky: buy a present for a niece’s upcoming wedding.

I bought it at Taylor’s mother’s boyfriend’s store, one of the coolest in Berea, where Taylor’s mother Jackie was working. We perused the store, chatted with Jackie, paid for the gift, and then just as we were getting ready to say goodbye, I looked down and noticed my underpants were showing. I mumbled something, tucked myself in and hugged Jackie goodbye. As we walked to the car, I asked David and my daughters, “So, was my underwear showing the whole time we were in the shop and nobody told me?

“I thought it was a tanktop,” Rozee said regarding the exposure of my undergarment. “I didn’t think underwear could be that high.”

I have long suffered complaints from my husband about how high up my underwear go. And Maddie’s dislike for the size of my underwear is legendary. She’s the child who had a fit when it hung on the clothesline to dry, and didn’t see the humor in the truly gigantic pair of underwear Kym and Ali Ries secretly hung on the line as a joke after my column appeared about Maddie’s embarrassment.

I’m probably going to have to reconsider my choice of clothing. Either bigger pants or longer shirts or maybe prettier colors or patterns so the stark white cotton isn’t so noticeable—anything to keep from generating comments about my underwear. On the trip back to Michigan, as I was getting out of the car at a rest area, I leaned away from David, exposing my backside.

“Hey, your underwear are big,” David noted.

“You’re not supposed to say that!” I admonished him. “You’re supposed to say they’re showing.”

“They’re big,” he explained, I guess trying to dig himself out of a hole. “They cover a lot of area.”

I had problems with him and Maddie all the way home.

I get ornery when I don’t eat, but David and Maddie don’t want to stop for food. I start feeling sick and claustrophobic and mean and I tell them I’m not going to travel with them anymore. David is driving but he holds out his hand for me to shake on it. That makes me laugh, but I don’t feel much better. I want to stop at a restaurant. They want to eat what’s in the car.

”We have lots of food,” David says.

But I know we don’t. I’m the one who packed the food. I remembered it at the last minute. If I hadn’t lost my list I’m sure I would have remembered to pack good stuff. I probably would have remembered to make muffins or cookies for the journey. Instead, at the last minute, I threw into a grocery bag whatever was at hand: raisins, prunes, corn chips, Ak-Mak crackers, oatmeal for David’s breakfast, a jar of peanut butter, but no knife.

They won’t relent so I put in a request for prunes, which aren’t quickly forthcoming from the back seat.

“Did you find the prunes?” I ask Maddie.

She offers up the bag of raisins.

“Those are raisins,” I say. “I want the prunes.”

“They’re the same thing,” she says impatiently. “They’re just littler.

Kind of like how my underwear should be.

    –May 31, 2007 

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