2006.12.13 Someone is a turkey and it's not Richard Lewis

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

My husband has written about geocaching several times in his By the Way column, so maybe you’re already acquainted with the notion of hunting for treasures outdoors in outlandish places. I enjoy geocaching the way I enjoy showers. I’m not big on getting under the water, but once there, I don’t want to leave. I revel in the warmth and the transformation from skankiness to cleanliness, but I hate making that plunge into the tub. 

I don’t operate the GPS unit and I don’t initiate our sojourns on geocache trips. I don’t even try very hard to find the treasure or “cache.” I just like seeing where we end up when David, armed with a pile of computer printouts of geocache sites, says, “There’s one two miles from here if you turn right. OK, now turn left. Go another mile. It’s somewhere within 100 feet. We should see a sign. Oops, we just missed it.”

I knew when I married him that my husband was rather shy and reserved, mild-mannered and easy-going, meek and mild. So I was rather unprepared for his latest scheme.

“What do you think about putting a geocache in our bedroom?” David posed this question the other day.

“Why do you ask?” I inquired when I stopped laughing.

“I thought I should get your permission first,” he said. “Although maybe Maddie’s room would be more of a challenge.”

Putting a geocache in our house seemed like a very bold and uncharacteristic thing for David to suggest. I can’t imagine him welcoming strangers popping up in our sleeping quarters, trying to find a box of trinkets stashed under our bed.

I’m more used to the kind of behavior he exhibited when we were in Miami walking the streets of Coconut Grove with our kids and Ben’s girlfriend Sarah, looking for a restaurant the day before Thanksgiving. We had stopped at an odd intersection to discuss the options, when David turned to me and said, “I think that was Richard Lewis who just walked by.”

“Where?” I asked, looking around.

He pointed down the street as a man in black rounded the corner.

“Why didn’t you stop and ask him?” I admonished David.

“I wasn’t sure, but I think it must have been. It looked so much like Richard Lewis that it has to be Richard Lewis,” he said, becoming more and more convinced.

It was the kookiest thing. Of all the celebrities we might have seen, it was so odd to see one we had just discovered. We had recently started watching on DVD the first couple seasons of Curb Your Enthusiasm, an HBO show conceived by and starring Larry David, the guy who produced Seinfeld.

Curb Your Enthusiasm is insanely funny; creative, but irreverent. The show follows Larry David through his daily foibles and blunders, and sometimes features actors who play themselves, such as Richard Lewis.

Every time Richard Lewis appeared on the show, David and I would turn to each other and say, “Who the heck is Richard Lewis?” Because we lived without a TV for so many years and rarely went to the movies, we have huge gaps in our cultural awareness.

Apparently, Richard Lewis was a famous comedian in his heyday. Maybe he’s still in it. In the show, he appears as Larry David’s hapless friend, a recovering alcoholic; neurotic, but very amusing. You can’t help but like the guy.

I probably belted David a couple of times on the arm for not stopping Richard Lewis to say “Hi” and compliment him on a great show. But then David looked back and said, “Here he comes again.” And there was this short man wearing black from head to toe, walking toward us like Groucho Marx.

“Go say ‘Hello’ to him,” I urged David. “He’s gonna get away.”

But the rest of the family had started shuffling along and David wasn’t budging. So, I walked over to the man in black, grabbed his arm in a friendly gesture and said, “You have to be Richard Lewis,” and he said, “Oh, I get that all the time.” But as soon as he spoke I knew it was him. “Where can I get a soda around here?” he wanted to know.

We chatted a bit and learned he was playing that weekend at the Improv comedy club nearby, and that Larry David is a great guy, not the schmuck he makes himself out to be on the show. Rozee snapped a quick photo and we let him go off to find his soda.

Later that night, we lamented, “Shoot, we should have asked Richard Lewis over for Thanksgiving dinner.”

The next day, I walked past David, standing with his hands against the wall in the hallway, one leg still, the other pumping backwards toward his behind. I looked at him, slightly askance, wondering what the heck kind of exercise this was.

“What are you doing?”

“I’m kicking myself for not asking Richard Lewis to eat Thanksgiving dinner with us.”

Wouldn’t that have been a great cache?

• To see the celebrity hunter with her cache, visit the Observer’s website (http://statelineobserver.com).

 

    - Dec. 13, 2006 
  • Front.splash
    Water Fun—Carter Seitz and Colson Walter take a fast trip along a plastic sliding strip while water from a sprinkler provides the lubrication. The boys took a break from tie-dyeing last week at Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program to cool off in the water.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Girls.on.ride
    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
  • Front.softball
    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.

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