The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2013.02.27 Oh where, oh where, can my little note be?

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

David said something funny last week and I quickly jotted it down on the handiest piece of paper—the Detroit Free Press—with the handiest writing implement...a washable purple marker that somehow had surfaced from when almost-two-year-old Caroline was visiting a couple months ago.

When he reminded me on Saturday night that it was my week to write a column, I remembered having taken those notes. But when I looked for the paper on Sunday, it was no longer on the table.

With a moan and a groan, I set to going through the recycling basket. The best thing about our current curbside recycling pick-up is that everything goes in one bag. But the worst thing about curbside recycling is that everything goes in one bag. 

I was going to have to pick through the glass jars and the plastic containers to make my way to the section of the Free Press on which I’d written the note. Fortunately, David is pretty fastidious about washing out jars and tin cans—I wasn’t going to encounter anything really gross.

Unfortunately, I was having no luck finding the note. I was certain I’d scrawled it on the left-hand side of a right-hand page toward the back of the main section of the newspaper. So I concentrated my efforts first on the main sections of the past week and when nothing panned out, moved on to the week before. 

I’d been gone a week and had had a lot of catch-up reading to do, so it could have been any paper over two weeks rather than just the Thursday I had written the note. Still no luck, so I moved on to all the other sections of the paper even though I never crack open the “Buy + Sell” classified section or Thursday’s “Motor City” section, rarely ever the Sports section, and only occasionally the Business section. I buy the paper for “Life” and the main section.

I couldn’t fathom why the note wasn’t just jumping out at me. I mentally started accusing David of peeling potatoes on it and tossing it in the garbage, but we hadn’t eaten potatoes in weeks. 

Onward I went, forcing myself not to be distracted by all the stories I’d previously ignored in the other sections—until I came to one on page five in the Thursday Business section, “Fiscal Discipline: Military families need to save to combat ongoing financial stress,” by Susan Tompor, that sounded too interesting to pass up. 

I started reading it and then decided I better set it aside and go through the rest of the pile. When I had no luck finding the note after going through every dang section of every dang paper in the basket, I figured I must be nuts so I might as well finish the “Fiscal Discipline” story.

Some money troubles are self-inflicted, says Tompor, “as service personnel turn to spending to cope with the stress of preparing for dangerous situations,” but others come from scam artists who do things like “sell stolen vehicles—or cars they don’t even have—at bargain prices claiming to be soldiers who are being deployed.”

Well, that was an interesting article, I thought as I folded the paper, but I still hadn’t found my note. Then, the one-page “dinky” of the six-page Business section fell out and as I tried to grab it and not drop the rest of the paper, purple ink caught my eye. 

There it was! On the left-hand side of page two of the Business section. I couldn’t have been more wrong about where I remembered writing the note. I briefly considered again that I might be going nuts, but I did remember reading the story next to the purple note.

Back on Thursday night, David was peeling carrots—preparing his sack lunch for the next day—and I was reading the Business section. It was a story about  Klaus Busse, Chrysler vice president of interior design. 

I remember being intrigued that this German designer went to the Texas State Fair “to study how pickup owners drove and worshipped their rigs” and laughing that he arrived wearing a pink Polo shirt and white tennis shoes. As writer Brent Snavely said, “not exactly the kind of look that draws a ‘Howdy, cowboy’ reaction.” 

Suddenly, while reading the story, I realized David was talking to me and I had absolutely no idea what he had just said.

“Holy cow!” I said in apology. “You just said words that did not penetrate my brain!”

“I was talking to my carrot,” he said, nonchalantly.

Hmm, maybe he’s the one going nuts?

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