2012.06.20 I'm simply naked without my clothes

Written by David Green.

I am naked without my clothes

I have no idea what transpired in the two weeks since writing my last column, but apparently nothing remotely amusing or noteworthy. So, to the archives I went. I found several past columns that amused me, but selected this one from almost exactly five years ago. Ben and Sarah and Rosie, Taylor and Caroline will be coming home in a few weeks, and we’ll all be heading to the cottage. This column should serve as a reminder to David: Don’t let history repeat itself!

 

By COLLEEN LEDDY

Never let a man pack a car.

Isn’t that what your mother always told you?

It’s a sexist thing to say. So let me be just a tad more specific: Never let David Green pack your car.

We were in a rush. I was setting things in the entryway to take on a quick overnight family gathering at David’s sister’s cottage on Gun Lake. The celebration would acknowledge two birthdays, an anniversary and Father’s Day, and the adventure would include a trip to Sam’s Joint—home of the most delectable barbecued chicken strips and potato wedges on the planet. 

My hastily packed suitcase was lined up, ready to go, full to the brim, equipped for all manner of Michigan weather: hot day/cool night (shorts, T-shirt, lightweight but long sleeve pajamas), cool day/cool night (long sleeve shirt, jeans, long johns and heavyweight long sleeve shirt), hot day/hot night (lightweight nightshirt)—and activity: running shorts, bathing suit, grungy jeans for geocaching.

We weren’t sure exactly where we would slumber, so we added sleeping bags and mats to the pile. I threw some beach towels, bagged sneakers and sandals, a scarf, sweatshirt and jacket, and the toiletries bag into a laundry basket. Loaded up some groceries and added the bags to the collection. While I whirled some basil into pesto, David filled the car with our belongings.

Never let a man pack a car.

We arrived in time for an early dinner at Sam’s and in the chilly air-conditioned restaurant, I kept thinking how nice it would be to slip into my thick Polartec long-johns (which I’d brought along as pajamas) when we got back to the cottage.

Remember Friday night? Was it cool here in Morenci? It was chilly at Gun Lake, but that didn’t deter the rest of the crowd from stopping at the Curly Cone for ice cream. I passed on the ice cream; I just really wanted to get into those warm long-johns.

Back at the cottage, we unloaded the car. 

Never let a man pack a car.

It’s OK to let a man unpack a car. What harm can he do? Take things out, carry them inside. Plop ’em down. Maybe he’ll put them in the wrong place. But that’s not so bad. You can move them to a better location. But let a man pack a car?

“Hey, where’s my suitcase?”

“What suitcase? I didn’t put a suitcase in the car.”

“You didn’t put my suitcase in the car?”

“This is an overnight. Who packs a suitcase for an overnight?”

“You really didn’t pack my suitcase? You’re kidding, right?”

“I’m not kidding. There's no suitcase in the car.”

“But I had my suitcase right there in the entryway with all the stuff to pack into the car.”

“I didn’t pack it.”

“You really didn’t pack my suitcase? You didn’t put my suitcase in the car? You’re kidding right?” 

He had to be kidding. But this joke was going on too long and his face looked too serious. Still, he had to be kidding. I am naked without my clothes. I need my clothes. I’d covered all the bases. I was prepared for any possible weather condition I might encounter, any activity we might engage in for the 24 hours we’d spend away from my closet and dresser drawers.

“How could you possibly not pack my suitcase?” I was containing my outrage pretty well, I thought. I was going to accept this situation. But I was still incredulous. My suitcase was sitting right there, among the rest of the flotsam and jetsam.

“Your suitcase had been sitting in the entryway all week after you got back from Berea. We were only going on an overnight so I didn’t think it was supposed to go to the cottage.”

“So you picked it up and actually moved it out of the way?”

OK, I am guilty of not putting the suitcase away after my quick trip to Berea, Ky., to drop Rozee off for a month’s work as a camp counselor. But it had been gone from the entryway for at least two days before I packed it again. Besides, the trip to Berea had been an overnight, so his reasoning made no sense. 

He can’t redeem himself. He’ll be in hot water until my steam blows off. He’s just lucky my sister-in-law Ginny offered me a mini-wardrobe of her own clothes (like any good woman, she overpacks). But I opted to wear my daughter Maddie’s extra sweatpants and t-shirt (like a good daughter, she overpacks).

Ginny was able to offer perspective on the situation with a packing tale of her own.

Her overnight suitcase for her wedding night was stowed in her car during the wedding. She engaged her brother to drive the car alone to the reception, but on the way there, it died. He abandoned the car (and suitcase within) on a street in St. Paul, and hitched out to the reception. As they were leaving the reception, Ginny learned her suitcase had never arrived. So she and Thom headed off to the B&B with no luggage. And in the morning, she had no choice but to wear her wedding dress to breakfast. 

Maybe our mothers should have told us: Never trust any man with your luggage.

  • Play Practice
    DRAMA—Fayette schools, in conjunction with the Opera House Theater program, will present two plays Friday night at the Fayette Opera House. From the left is Autumn Black, Wyatt Mitchell, Elizabeth Myers, Jonah Perdue, Sam Myers (in the back) and Lauren Dale. Other cast members are Brynn Balmer, Mason Maginn, Ashtyn Dominique, Stephanie Munguia and Sierra Munguia. Jason Stuckey serves as the technician and Trinity Leady is the backstage manager. The plays will be performed during the day Friday for students and for the public at 7 p.m. Friday.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
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    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
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    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
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  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
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