The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.

2012.02.15 She may be nuts, but doesn't faze her husband

Written by David Green.

This was a week when grant writing for the library won out over column writing for the Observer. Here’s a repeat from March 30, 2005. It’s a little hard to believe that just seven years ago I was worrying about Maddie driving to Adrian and back. Now I get to worry about her hitch-hiking in New Zealand.

By Colleen Leddy

I’m surprised that nobody has said out loud, at least not to me anyway, how horrible I must be to live with. OK, 16-year-old Maddie hints at it on a regular basis. It’s true; recently, I’ve been in a heightened state of obnoxiousness. I don’t know if it’s a good thing or a bad thing that I am aware of my shortcomings—so aware, in fact, that I can even give warning, “Look out!” I say. “I’m a witch with a capital B!”

Other times, I’m just plain disconnected with reality, and I put my poor youngest through the mill.

Maddie went to Adrian Saturday night, driving there without a grown-up in the vehicle for the first time, and I made her call me when she got there, when she left the first store, when she got to the mall, when she left the mall, when she got to the next store, when she left that store and then when she arrived back in the Morenci area at her boyfriend’s house.

She had insisted before leaving town that I was nuts for wanting her to call so much, but she did as she was told—over and over, all seven times. I think she was trying to teach me a lesson—after about the fourth call, I realized I was indeed nuts and jokingly said, “Quit calling so much!”

But that doesn’t concern me as much as this really weird psychosomatic thing I’ve got going on. Now in the past, (OK, I still do it.) I’ve read articles of a medical nature and when I read all the symptoms, I’m usually ticking them off in my head: yup, got that, got that too, uh huh, that sounds like me, et cetera, et cetera, ad nauseam. David has seen me through heart disease, stroke, diabetes, lupus, colon cancer, ovarian cancer, fibroid tumors and a host of other ailments that I think, for a moment, have stricken me.

“It’s a wonder you’re not dead,” he said the other day when I read aloud the symptoms of yet another condition.

That’s nothing compared to what’s been happening lately. Maddie mentioned that her knee hurt after running at track practice. Later, she was chatting online with Rozee who was talking about the pain from her floating knee cap and whether she would be able to run track for Berea College this season. Not two minutes later, my knee started hurting.

And then, after David had been X-rayed for a frozen shoulder, my shoulder started to hurt.

Maybe it’s the full moons, maybe it’s pre-menopause, maybe it’s mid-life crisis, but I know that I’m going through a...well, let’s hope that’s all it is...a phase. It’s not just being way over-protective with the baby of the family or mirroring the pain of my family members—there’s my diminished mental capacity all around. But at least I’m going down in good company.

A couple of weeks ago, David was looking for a needle to sew a button on a favorite shirt. It’s a ratty looking shirt, not worth repairing in my estimation, but I guess he likes it enough to go to the trouble of fixing it. I think it’s just a reflection of my stressed out state that plants me firmly as a member of the throwaway society. I don’t really want to be associated with that contingent of Americans, but I find that I am making some really poor choices lately.

OK, I confess. It’s not just lately. For example, I’ve been secretly throwing away tomato sauce jars for some time now rather than washing them out and placing them in the recycle bin. But in our house, a jar of sauce sits awhile in the fridge before it’s totally consumed—long enough that it accumulates dried tomato matter around the rim, like stuff on a ketchup bottle. I just can’t get up the gumption to swipe the sponge around that goop. So when David isn’t looking, I toss the offenders in the garbage.

This is a major digression here, because I really was just going to mention how, when David was looking for the needles, I was only vaguely aware that he was going from room to room downstairs, looking in the likeliest needle havens and coming up empty.

“I think there are some noodles upstairs,” I said, completely unaware that I had substituted the word noodle for needle.

“I don’t need any noodles now,” David said without skipping a beat and headed upstairs.

He responded in a matter-of-fact way, as if perhaps, at some point in time he might be combing the house for noodles, but just not now.

It’s quite heartening, because when  my dementia really sets in, David won’t be fazed at all.

I just hope that’s a phase he never outgrows.

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