The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
  • Front.homecoming Court
  • Cheer
  • Front.park.lights
  • Front.pull
  • Front.ropes
  • Front.sculpt
  • Front.tar.wide
  • Front.toss
  • Front.walk Across

2011.09.14 What's for lunch?

Written by David Green.


 Is there something inherently wrong with eating potato chips for breakfast? Even followed by a healthy fruit salad full of brain power booster berries like raspberries and black raspberries, plus strawberries, peaches and pears?

OK, I know it’s really wrong. But that’s one of the great perks of being a grownup whose children have flown the coop and whose husband is in the other room—nobody to tell you what to do. Nobody to tell you: Put those chips back and eat a bowl of oatmeal.

Nobody, except the voice in your head of your husband saying, “Leddy, are you crazy? Put those chips back and eat a bowl of oatmeal!”

It’s a big bag of potato chips. I didn’t realize how big when I first bought it.

“You didn’t notice the weight of it?” David asked when he hefted the two pound bag.

“I just wanted potato chips so I grabbed them,” I replied.

We don’t eat a whole lot of potato chips and I don’t buy them on a regular basis. They have to be on sale and they have to be one of only two brands. So, when we finally have them, it’s a case of deprivation-induced desire winning out over Puritan-inspired restraint.

The Puritans always lose out around me.

After eating a hearty handful of potato chips one morning, I remembered I’d also bought a jar of pickles. And nothing beats pickle and potato chip sandwiches (sliced pickles layered between two potato chips)—except fried potato sandwiches (fried potatoes slathered with fried onions and ketchup between two slices of bread).

I would propose that potato chips for breakfast is probably better than my next dietary transgression:  dark chocolate for dinner. I didn’t plan that meal in advance, but after consuming half a 3.5 ounce chocolate bar, I worked right through the dinner hour and half-way into the night. If you need to get a lot done, dark chocolate for dinner is a sure road to success.

I was feeling guilty about eating such a poor dinner, but then I remembered a snippet of news I’d heard recently supporting the health benefits of chocolate.

The New York Times covered the story, but WABC-TV News in New York summarized it more readable language.

Researchers analyzed the results of seven studies that included more than 100,000 people with and without heart disease.

They compared those who ate large amounts of chocolate to those who ate very little, and found those who consumed more chocolate reduced the risk of having heart disease by more than a third. 

Chocolate-eaters were 29-percent less likely to have a stroke.

The studies included all types of chocolate, including chocolate bars, drinks and cookies.

But usually dark chocolate has been found to have the strongest benefits because it contains more antioxidants that may lower blood pressure and help ward off Type Two diabetes.

There is, of course, a catch. None of the research proves that the chocolate is creating the benefit.

Chocolate, we all know, is also creating wider hips, bigger stomachs and higher numbers on scales. Just ask me. I’ve been a steady consumer for years. Wider, bigger, higher—I’m all that. 

Not the most enviable shape to be in 10 days before my 35th high school reunion, but I’m looking on the bright side. I’ve calculated that I’ve gained one pound for every year since I graduated in 1976. Surely there must be an award for that?

That award might be in jeopardy, though. I went to Dallas last week to participate in a library related focus group (all expenses paid by the sponsoring organization) and attend the Association for Rural and Small Libraries conference. 

During the focus group meeting, the hotel people kept popping in with food all the time...brownies and chocolate chip cookies, warm popcorn, Cracker Jacks, hot New York-style pretzels with mustard, and the topper: a little ice cream cart filled with Haägen Dazs ice cream bars. “One of everything” is my motto when it comes to dessert offerings. 

It’s no wonder I gained five pounds in the five days I was gone. A pound a day—do they give awards for that?

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2015