The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2011.09.14 What's for lunch?

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

 Is there something inherently wrong with eating potato chips for breakfast? Even followed by a healthy fruit salad full of brain power booster berries like raspberries and black raspberries, plus strawberries, peaches and pears?

OK, I know it’s really wrong. But that’s one of the great perks of being a grownup whose children have flown the coop and whose husband is in the other room—nobody to tell you what to do. Nobody to tell you: Put those chips back and eat a bowl of oatmeal.

Nobody, except the voice in your head of your husband saying, “Leddy, are you crazy? Put those chips back and eat a bowl of oatmeal!”

It’s a big bag of potato chips. I didn’t realize how big when I first bought it.

“You didn’t notice the weight of it?” David asked when he hefted the two pound bag.

“I just wanted potato chips so I grabbed them,” I replied.

We don’t eat a whole lot of potato chips and I don’t buy them on a regular basis. They have to be on sale and they have to be one of only two brands. So, when we finally have them, it’s a case of deprivation-induced desire winning out over Puritan-inspired restraint.

The Puritans always lose out around me.

After eating a hearty handful of potato chips one morning, I remembered I’d also bought a jar of pickles. And nothing beats pickle and potato chip sandwiches (sliced pickles layered between two potato chips)—except fried potato sandwiches (fried potatoes slathered with fried onions and ketchup between two slices of bread).

I would propose that potato chips for breakfast is probably better than my next dietary transgression:  dark chocolate for dinner. I didn’t plan that meal in advance, but after consuming half a 3.5 ounce chocolate bar, I worked right through the dinner hour and half-way into the night. If you need to get a lot done, dark chocolate for dinner is a sure road to success.

I was feeling guilty about eating such a poor dinner, but then I remembered a snippet of news I’d heard recently supporting the health benefits of chocolate.

The New York Times covered the story, but WABC-TV News in New York summarized it more readable language.

Researchers analyzed the results of seven studies that included more than 100,000 people with and without heart disease.

They compared those who ate large amounts of chocolate to those who ate very little, and found those who consumed more chocolate reduced the risk of having heart disease by more than a third. 

Chocolate-eaters were 29-percent less likely to have a stroke.

The studies included all types of chocolate, including chocolate bars, drinks and cookies.

But usually dark chocolate has been found to have the strongest benefits because it contains more antioxidants that may lower blood pressure and help ward off Type Two diabetes.

There is, of course, a catch. None of the research proves that the chocolate is creating the benefit.

Chocolate, we all know, is also creating wider hips, bigger stomachs and higher numbers on scales. Just ask me. I’ve been a steady consumer for years. Wider, bigger, higher—I’m all that. 

Not the most enviable shape to be in 10 days before my 35th high school reunion, but I’m looking on the bright side. I’ve calculated that I’ve gained one pound for every year since I graduated in 1976. Surely there must be an award for that?

That award might be in jeopardy, though. I went to Dallas last week to participate in a library related focus group (all expenses paid by the sponsoring organization) and attend the Association for Rural and Small Libraries conference. 

During the focus group meeting, the hotel people kept popping in with food all the time...brownies and chocolate chip cookies, warm popcorn, Cracker Jacks, hot New York-style pretzels with mustard, and the topper: a little ice cream cart filled with Haägen Dazs ice cream bars. “One of everything” is my motto when it comes to dessert offerings. 

It’s no wonder I gained five pounds in the five days I was gone. A pound a day—do they give awards for that?

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