The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2011.08.31 Packing my suitcase is not a piece of cake

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

We don’t really get much mail at our house anymore. Recording our names on do not mail lists stemmed some of the tide, although credit card offers still arrive unwanted. 

But then Rosie spent the summer here, and besides Caroline, a flood of mail followed her. She and Taylor were responsible nomads and filed change of address cards at the post office. They even contacted everyone they do business with—including at least three magazine publishers.

Magazines are addressed so far in advance and Rosie didn’t have much warning on her future address, so an issue of each of their subscriptions arrived after her departure. 

I was relaying customer numbers from the magazines’ labels in an e-mail to her Monday night, when I decided to crack open one of them. An article titled, “How Not to Pack” caught my eye. According to my husband, the man who gets by packing only a pair of underwear and socks for a weekend trip, I have a serious packing problem.

It only feels serious when he isn’t along on journeys to help me schlep my stuff. Most of the time, when we travel by car, I don’t see what difference it makes if I pack five pairs of shoes for a weekend of at least five different shoe-wearing activities. 

And, socks and underwear? They’re so little—why not pack twice as many as the number of days you’ll be gone? OK, mine are not so little, not my underwear and not my size 11 foot coverings. But, relatively speaking? When you can stuff them in your shoes to save space? What’s the big deal? Especially if it rains every day and your socks get wet. What’s wrong with wanting dry feet?

I give a lot of thought to what gets loaded in my suitcase, so you can see why a headline like “How Not to Pack” might grab my immediate attention—even when I’ve just decided to make some kind of dessert because it seems like it’s been so long since we’ve had something good and delicious to eat (although, for me, it’s only been since Saturday night when I bought two dessert bars at the food co-op’s café and ate most of them before arriving home).

We’ve been eating stuff like brown rice and green beans and tomatoes and swiss chard and it’s just not filling me up. I tried the macrobiotic trick of ending a meal with raisins and even a dried apricot, but that just feels like someone’s being cruel. Kind of like how my kids probably felt when the Easter Bunny left the almond stuffed prunes in their baskets.

So, even though it’s Monday night and I belong down at the Observer, I’ve pulled out the ingredients for some kind of cake involving walnuts, almonds, cinnamon, nutmeg, blueberries, yogurt and oatmeal. And, then somehow, I end up at the greatest source of distraction known to attention surfeit adults, typing an e-mail to Rosie and falling upon “How Not to Pack,” by Peter Jon Lindberg, a travel writer with a propensity to overpack.

What a wonderful article! Which, I say even though I don’t have a third of the problem this guy does. But it’s just so nice to see my inclination to overpack articulated in black and white, eloquently, accurately—and hilariously. Here’s an excerpt:

“I’d like to say I was different in youth, carefree and light on my feet. But I was a terrible backpacker, too...For a Eurail trip in college I basically stuffed my entire dorm room into three...giant Eagle Creek duffel bags. None of the bags had wheels; for all my failures I was determined to stick to the spirit of backpacking, which seemed to be about Suspending One’s Belongings From One’s Person. And so...I secured all three bags to my body, front, rear, and side, until I resembled a lopsided bomb-squad technician, or a human battering ram. The simple act of entering a train compartment was like giving birth to myself.”

Later he writes, “Having options makes me happy.” And I think, “My gosh! That’s it! ‘Options!‘ ‘Options’ validated!” Because that is my whole point when I pack way more than I’ll need for a trip. It’s not just being prepared for every eventuality—I like having things to choose from. I bring some stuff knowing full well I might not wear it.

Before a recent overnight trip, David prodded me to fill just a small backpack. I balked, telling him that wasn’t enough.

“I know...you have to be prepared for rain...snow...fog,” he said.

Ha! Fog! What to wear for fog?! I’ll have to work on that.

By the way, the cake is delicious—and I’m really packing it in.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016