2011.08.31 Packing my suitcase is not a piece of cake

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

We don’t really get much mail at our house anymore. Recording our names on do not mail lists stemmed some of the tide, although credit card offers still arrive unwanted. 

But then Rosie spent the summer here, and besides Caroline, a flood of mail followed her. She and Taylor were responsible nomads and filed change of address cards at the post office. They even contacted everyone they do business with—including at least three magazine publishers.

Magazines are addressed so far in advance and Rosie didn’t have much warning on her future address, so an issue of each of their subscriptions arrived after her departure. 

I was relaying customer numbers from the magazines’ labels in an e-mail to her Monday night, when I decided to crack open one of them. An article titled, “How Not to Pack” caught my eye. According to my husband, the man who gets by packing only a pair of underwear and socks for a weekend trip, I have a serious packing problem.

It only feels serious when he isn’t along on journeys to help me schlep my stuff. Most of the time, when we travel by car, I don’t see what difference it makes if I pack five pairs of shoes for a weekend of at least five different shoe-wearing activities. 

And, socks and underwear? They’re so little—why not pack twice as many as the number of days you’ll be gone? OK, mine are not so little, not my underwear and not my size 11 foot coverings. But, relatively speaking? When you can stuff them in your shoes to save space? What’s the big deal? Especially if it rains every day and your socks get wet. What’s wrong with wanting dry feet?

I give a lot of thought to what gets loaded in my suitcase, so you can see why a headline like “How Not to Pack” might grab my immediate attention—even when I’ve just decided to make some kind of dessert because it seems like it’s been so long since we’ve had something good and delicious to eat (although, for me, it’s only been since Saturday night when I bought two dessert bars at the food co-op’s café and ate most of them before arriving home).

We’ve been eating stuff like brown rice and green beans and tomatoes and swiss chard and it’s just not filling me up. I tried the macrobiotic trick of ending a meal with raisins and even a dried apricot, but that just feels like someone’s being cruel. Kind of like how my kids probably felt when the Easter Bunny left the almond stuffed prunes in their baskets.

So, even though it’s Monday night and I belong down at the Observer, I’ve pulled out the ingredients for some kind of cake involving walnuts, almonds, cinnamon, nutmeg, blueberries, yogurt and oatmeal. And, then somehow, I end up at the greatest source of distraction known to attention surfeit adults, typing an e-mail to Rosie and falling upon “How Not to Pack,” by Peter Jon Lindberg, a travel writer with a propensity to overpack.

What a wonderful article! Which, I say even though I don’t have a third of the problem this guy does. But it’s just so nice to see my inclination to overpack articulated in black and white, eloquently, accurately—and hilariously. Here’s an excerpt:

“I’d like to say I was different in youth, carefree and light on my feet. But I was a terrible backpacker, too...For a Eurail trip in college I basically stuffed my entire dorm room into three...giant Eagle Creek duffel bags. None of the bags had wheels; for all my failures I was determined to stick to the spirit of backpacking, which seemed to be about Suspending One’s Belongings From One’s Person. And so...I secured all three bags to my body, front, rear, and side, until I resembled a lopsided bomb-squad technician, or a human battering ram. The simple act of entering a train compartment was like giving birth to myself.”

Later he writes, “Having options makes me happy.” And I think, “My gosh! That’s it! ‘Options!‘ ‘Options’ validated!” Because that is my whole point when I pack way more than I’ll need for a trip. It’s not just being prepared for every eventuality—I like having things to choose from. I bring some stuff knowing full well I might not wear it.

Before a recent overnight trip, David prodded me to fill just a small backpack. I balked, telling him that wasn’t enough.

“I know...you have to be prepared for rain...snow...fog,” he said.

Ha! Fog! What to wear for fog?! I’ll have to work on that.

By the way, the cake is delicious—and I’m really packing it in.

  • Play Practice
    DRAMA—Fayette schools, in conjunction with the Opera House Theater program, will present two plays Friday night at the Fayette Opera House. From the left is Autumn Black, Wyatt Mitchell, Elizabeth Myers, Jonah Perdue, Sam Myers (in the back) and Lauren Dale. Other cast members are Brynn Balmer, Mason Maginn, Ashtyn Dominique, Stephanie Munguia and Sierra Munguia. Jason Stuckey serves as the technician and Trinity Leady is the backstage manager. The plays will be performed during the day Friday for students and for the public at 7 p.m. Friday.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rover
    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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