2006.10.18 Running the race, and living to tell about it

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

Grace (Tarala) Johnston was right. Intervals of two minutes running at an easy pace and one minute walking at a slow pace will get you to the finish line faster than my combination of running at a faster pace until you feel like croaking, and then walking at a relatively fast pace until you’re afraid if you don’t start running again, you’ll be dead last in the race.

Ah, the race. The Neal V. Singles Memorial 5K Run. My husband groaned when he read the start of my column two weeks ago.

“You’re not going to write about running again, are you?”

“What else am I going to write about?” I asked.

“You can’t do that to your readers,” he said.

So I didn’t.

But then people kept asking me if I finished the race, and if they happened to read the race results, they asked if I was happy with how I had done.

Let me say that I was both pleased with and amused by my performance. Even though Grace showed me the folly of my ways, I am proud to be the owner of the coolest medal I have ever seen; far cooler than any medal any of my three children have won in cross country and track events.

Yes, I placed third in my age group and thus became a medalist in the first annual Neal Singles run. Of course, there were only three people in my age group (the amusing part), but as Grace said, think of all the women who didn’t even enter the race. I beat the pants off of them, all right! And, I like to think that the first two placers in my age group were among those who took the wrong turn and thus lopped three tenths of a mile off their course. I ran/walked the whole dang 3.1 miles.

I liken the experience to being in labor with my firstborn, Ben. David and I had taken Lamaze or whatever childbirth preparation classes were offered 24 years ago. They taught us breathing exercises and relaxation techniques and harped on focal points and the stages of labor and which breathing patterns to do for each particular stage of labor. I don’t remember what else.

David was an excellent Lamaze partner who made sure I exercised regularly and practiced my breathing and relaxation techniques every night.  When I was finally in the throes of labor, all that regimentation went out the window. Relax? Hell, I was having a baby! There’s nothing relaxing about that. I found comfort in throwing up. And when David consulted his stopwatch to time the contractions, I could have belted him one. I just wanted to sling my arm around his shoulder and lean on him as I walked up and down the halls of the maternity ward.

When he noted I must be in the transition stage and should begin a different breathing pattern, I think I might have tossed his watch across the room. There was no way I could breathe in any prescribed pattern. I just did what felt right. I’m sure I must have learned something in that class that came in handy for the actual birthing experience. I know pelvic rocking proved beneficial in Rozee’s birth three and a half years later. But when it came to the breathing exercises, they went out the same window. It seems the only purpose they served was something to rebel against: Well, heck, that’s not working. I’ll do this instead.

And the same sort of thing happened with running. As the day of the race neared, I realized none of the standard methods such as Jeff Galloway and coolrunning.com were working for me. So I tried the technique David had suggested at the start of my “training.”

“Why don’t you run until you feel like stopping and then walk until you feel like running,”  he said.

Ah, after all these years, the man knows me better than I know myself. When he had first suggested that, I pooh-poohed him.

“That won’t work,” I told him. “I feel like stopping just about as soon as I start. I’d be walking the whole race.”

By the week of the race I realized I really only like running if I can do it at a faster pace. Sure, I could “run” three miles continuously, but it would be at such a slow pace, I’d be miserable the whole way. So I may not have completed the course as fast as I would have liked, but I had a good time doing it—the anti-Lamaze way, so to speak.

And I didn’t come in dead last.

Or dead, for that matter.


   - Oct. 18, 2006
 

  • Play Practice
    DRAMA—Fayette schools, in conjunction with the Opera House Theater program, will present two plays Friday night at the Fayette Opera House. From the left is Autumn Black, Wyatt Mitchell, Elizabeth Myers, Jonah Perdue, Sam Myers (in the back) and Lauren Dale. Other cast members are Brynn Balmer, Mason Maginn, Ashtyn Dominique, Stephanie Munguia and Sierra Munguia. Jason Stuckey serves as the technician and Trinity Leady is the backstage manager. The plays will be performed during the day Friday for students and for the public at 7 p.m. Friday.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rover
    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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