2006.10.18 Running the race, and living to tell about it

Written by David Green.


Grace (Tarala) Johnston was right. Intervals of two minutes running at an easy pace and one minute walking at a slow pace will get you to the finish line faster than my combination of running at a faster pace until you feel like croaking, and then walking at a relatively fast pace until you’re afraid if you don’t start running again, you’ll be dead last in the race.

Ah, the race. The Neal V. Singles Memorial 5K Run. My husband groaned when he read the start of my column two weeks ago.

“You’re not going to write about running again, are you?”

“What else am I going to write about?” I asked.

“You can’t do that to your readers,” he said.

So I didn’t.

But then people kept asking me if I finished the race, and if they happened to read the race results, they asked if I was happy with how I had done.

Let me say that I was both pleased with and amused by my performance. Even though Grace showed me the folly of my ways, I am proud to be the owner of the coolest medal I have ever seen; far cooler than any medal any of my three children have won in cross country and track events.

Yes, I placed third in my age group and thus became a medalist in the first annual Neal Singles run. Of course, there were only three people in my age group (the amusing part), but as Grace said, think of all the women who didn’t even enter the race. I beat the pants off of them, all right! And, I like to think that the first two placers in my age group were among those who took the wrong turn and thus lopped three tenths of a mile off their course. I ran/walked the whole dang 3.1 miles.

I liken the experience to being in labor with my firstborn, Ben. David and I had taken Lamaze or whatever childbirth preparation classes were offered 24 years ago. They taught us breathing exercises and relaxation techniques and harped on focal points and the stages of labor and which breathing patterns to do for each particular stage of labor. I don’t remember what else.

David was an excellent Lamaze partner who made sure I exercised regularly and practiced my breathing and relaxation techniques every night.  When I was finally in the throes of labor, all that regimentation went out the window. Relax? Hell, I was having a baby! There’s nothing relaxing about that. I found comfort in throwing up. And when David consulted his stopwatch to time the contractions, I could have belted him one. I just wanted to sling my arm around his shoulder and lean on him as I walked up and down the halls of the maternity ward.

When he noted I must be in the transition stage and should begin a different breathing pattern, I think I might have tossed his watch across the room. There was no way I could breathe in any prescribed pattern. I just did what felt right. I’m sure I must have learned something in that class that came in handy for the actual birthing experience. I know pelvic rocking proved beneficial in Rozee’s birth three and a half years later. But when it came to the breathing exercises, they went out the same window. It seems the only purpose they served was something to rebel against: Well, heck, that’s not working. I’ll do this instead.

And the same sort of thing happened with running. As the day of the race neared, I realized none of the standard methods such as Jeff Galloway and coolrunning.com were working for me. So I tried the technique David had suggested at the start of my “training.”

“Why don’t you run until you feel like stopping and then walk until you feel like running,”  he said.

Ah, after all these years, the man knows me better than I know myself. When he had first suggested that, I pooh-poohed him.

“That won’t work,” I told him. “I feel like stopping just about as soon as I start. I’d be walking the whole race.”

By the week of the race I realized I really only like running if I can do it at a faster pace. Sure, I could “run” three miles continuously, but it would be at such a slow pace, I’d be miserable the whole way. So I may not have completed the course as fast as I would have liked, but I had a good time doing it—the anti-Lamaze way, so to speak.

And I didn’t come in dead last.

Or dead, for that matter.

   - Oct. 18, 2006

  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
  • Front.chat
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016