The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

2011.06.22 Trying to capture the "Essence of Morenci"

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

Kym Ries and I leave for New Orleans Thursday. We’ll be attending the American Library Association Annual Conference to present a summary of the “Picturing New York...in a tiny Midwest town” program the library hosted in November. 

Five of the 30 libraries that won an ALA grant for programming related to the Picturing America collection were selected to showcase their program during a conference session, “NEH’s Picturing America: Model Programs for Public Libraries.” 

I vacillate between thinking it’s going to be so much fun telling everyone who attends the session about Kym’s cool idea (to use all the posters in the National Endowment for the Humanities Picturing America collection that have anything to do with New York City) and wanting to throw up at the prospect of talking in front of all the people who attend. 

And, then, I worry, will anyone even attend? I worry even more...will I get the darn PowerPoint presentation done in time? It’s late Monday night and I need to have it e-mailed to the Project Director of the ALA’s Public Program Office by 5 p.m. At least, I assume she means 5 p.m.

First she said she needed the presentation by Tuesday. I had planned to have it done by Sunday night and e-mailed by Monday. But then I got an ocular migraine around midnight, just when I was really hitting my stride. 

Ocular migraines don’t hurt, at least not my variety, but they make you see funny things. It’s kind of like the peripheral vision test the Secretary of State gives when you renew your driver’s license or when you go for an eye exam at Dr. Cable’s office and they take you into that little room, give you a button gizmo to press and make you look into some kind of machine that periodically flashes these weird lines. You press the button every time you see the lines.

Flashing weird lines...that’s what I see all the time when I get an ocular migraine and I can’t really read or see well enough to work on the computer. So, I was totally done for and had to just go to bed. At midnight...when the night was still young. That meant I had to ask what time Tuesday the presentation had to be submitted.

The Project Director wrote back, “By the end of the day would be fine...” and I laughed out loud. 

“Lady,” I wanted to say, “The end of the day is right about 3 or 4 a.m. for me.” I wrote her to that effect and she wrote back Tuesday morning saying, realistically, she wouldn’t look at the file anyway at 5 p.m.

“So it would be fine if you send it whenever your day ends, and I’ll have it first thing tomorrow.”

That was great news to wake up to after going to bed at 7 a.m. But it also means, without a sharp Tuesday deadline, I will tinker and tinker and tinker and be up to all hours. 

It’s really a short presentation—each library is limited to 15 minutes—but there is so much to pack in about the program. And then the ALA project director suggested I start off talking a bit about Morenci. That meant I had to toss in a few photos to illustrate the essence of Morenci. 

I was hoping to take a photo of one of those huge tractors that come through town, parked at the light in front of the bank. I thought that would capture the town and country theme exemplified even in our festival, the wonderful architecture of our older buildings, the “one stoplight” size of our town

It got me thinking about what is quintessentially Morenci. Back when the trees almost formed a canopy over Main Street, I loved to return home from vacations and drive in from the west and see those trees. The trees of Morenci were a real drawing card for me. 

Then when I walked out of the library to take photos, I noticed the Fireworks Fund thermometer painted on the front window of Rural Urban Insurance and the names of all those who donated. 

And, it hit me that the essence of this town is the people—the incredibly giving and helpful people who rally behind causes, who pull together in the face of both adversity and good fortune, who devote time and energy to make things happen to enrich the lives of others.

People like Kym Ries.

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