2011.06.22 Trying to capture the "Essence of Morenci"

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

Kym Ries and I leave for New Orleans Thursday. We’ll be attending the American Library Association Annual Conference to present a summary of the “Picturing New York...in a tiny Midwest town” program the library hosted in November. 

Five of the 30 libraries that won an ALA grant for programming related to the Picturing America collection were selected to showcase their program during a conference session, “NEH’s Picturing America: Model Programs for Public Libraries.” 

I vacillate between thinking it’s going to be so much fun telling everyone who attends the session about Kym’s cool idea (to use all the posters in the National Endowment for the Humanities Picturing America collection that have anything to do with New York City) and wanting to throw up at the prospect of talking in front of all the people who attend. 

And, then, I worry, will anyone even attend? I worry even more...will I get the darn PowerPoint presentation done in time? It’s late Monday night and I need to have it e-mailed to the Project Director of the ALA’s Public Program Office by 5 p.m. At least, I assume she means 5 p.m.

First she said she needed the presentation by Tuesday. I had planned to have it done by Sunday night and e-mailed by Monday. But then I got an ocular migraine around midnight, just when I was really hitting my stride. 

Ocular migraines don’t hurt, at least not my variety, but they make you see funny things. It’s kind of like the peripheral vision test the Secretary of State gives when you renew your driver’s license or when you go for an eye exam at Dr. Cable’s office and they take you into that little room, give you a button gizmo to press and make you look into some kind of machine that periodically flashes these weird lines. You press the button every time you see the lines.

Flashing weird lines...that’s what I see all the time when I get an ocular migraine and I can’t really read or see well enough to work on the computer. So, I was totally done for and had to just go to bed. At midnight...when the night was still young. That meant I had to ask what time Tuesday the presentation had to be submitted.

The Project Director wrote back, “By the end of the day would be fine...” and I laughed out loud. 

“Lady,” I wanted to say, “The end of the day is right about 3 or 4 a.m. for me.” I wrote her to that effect and she wrote back Tuesday morning saying, realistically, she wouldn’t look at the file anyway at 5 p.m.

“So it would be fine if you send it whenever your day ends, and I’ll have it first thing tomorrow.”

That was great news to wake up to after going to bed at 7 a.m. But it also means, without a sharp Tuesday deadline, I will tinker and tinker and tinker and be up to all hours. 

It’s really a short presentation—each library is limited to 15 minutes—but there is so much to pack in about the program. And then the ALA project director suggested I start off talking a bit about Morenci. That meant I had to toss in a few photos to illustrate the essence of Morenci. 

I was hoping to take a photo of one of those huge tractors that come through town, parked at the light in front of the bank. I thought that would capture the town and country theme exemplified even in our festival, the wonderful architecture of our older buildings, the “one stoplight” size of our town

It got me thinking about what is quintessentially Morenci. Back when the trees almost formed a canopy over Main Street, I loved to return home from vacations and drive in from the west and see those trees. The trees of Morenci were a real drawing card for me. 

Then when I walked out of the library to take photos, I noticed the Fireworks Fund thermometer painted on the front window of Rural Urban Insurance and the names of all those who donated. 

And, it hit me that the essence of this town is the people—the incredibly giving and helpful people who rally behind causes, who pull together in the face of both adversity and good fortune, who devote time and energy to make things happen to enrich the lives of others.

People like Kym Ries.

  • Play Practice
    DRAMA—Fayette schools, in conjunction with the Opera House Theater program, will present two plays Friday night at the Fayette Opera House. From the left is Autumn Black, Wyatt Mitchell, Elizabeth Myers, Jonah Perdue, Sam Myers (in the back) and Lauren Dale. Other cast members are Brynn Balmer, Mason Maginn, Ashtyn Dominique, Stephanie Munguia and Sierra Munguia. Jason Stuckey serves as the technician and Trinity Leady is the backstage manager. The plays will be performed during the day Friday for students and for the public at 7 p.m. Friday.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rover
    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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