The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

2010.10.13 My own brand of misery not really so miserable

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

I think I may finally be on the upswing, but, suffering with a cold during four of the most exquisitely beautiful days of fall, I’ve been miserable.

“Miserable” is a word that always makes me think of the opening line of Frank McCourt’s book, “Angela’s Ashes.”

“It was, of course, a miserable childhood: the happy childhood is hardly worth your while. Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood.”

No one can compete with McCourt’s miserable; my “miserable” couldn’t stand up to it.

“People everywhere brag and whimper about the woes of their early years, but nothing can compare with the Irish version: the poverty; the shiftless loquacious alcoholic father; the pious defeated mother moaning by the fire; pompous priests; bullying schoolmasters; the English and the terrible things they did to us for eight hundred long years.

“Above all—we were wet.

“Out in the Atlantic Ocean great sheets of rain gathered to drift slowly up the River Shannon and settle forever in Limerick. The rain dampened the city from the Feast of the Circumcision to New Year’s Eve. It created a cacophony of hacking coughs, bronchial rattles, asthmatic wheezes, consumptive croaks. It turned noses into fountains, lungs into bacterial sponges.”

McCourt goes on…363 pages of misery, really well-written misery, but miserable misery nonetheless.

My “miserable” is just a mere little cold, not anywhere near as bad as most other unfortunate things in the world, but the sore throat, burning eyes, fever/chills, aching head, cough, postnasal drip and nose like a faucet (is it called pre-nasal drip?), and achy legs that feel like they can’t hold the rest of my body upright all put me into my own little category of misery.

I left work early on Monday—went home and after eating a late lunch, laid my aching body down on the couch, and put my feet up on a cushion. It was pure ecstasy, indescribably wonderful. It made me wonder if this is why people do drugs like heroin or cocaine. They could save themselves the money and bother just by lying on the couch.

A two-hour nap didn’t impart the restorative effect I’d hoped for, but I perked up enough to proofread copy for this week’s paper and eat another of David’s dandy dinners.

Monday night, still too sick to attend a council meeting or lay out pages at the Observer, but not tired enough for another nap, I looked over my entertainment options: finish reading an article from The New Yorker magazine, “The Next Incarnation: As the Dalai Lama turns seventy-five what is Tibet’s future?” or choose from one of two anything-but-the-mainstream movies David had ordered from Netflix.

I was pretty desperate for reading material when I picked up the magazine. I don’t want to get hooked on a book when I’m so busy with Prime Time and planning for the next big library event: “Picturing New York...in a tiny Midwest town” on Nov. 13. Books are dangerous things in my possession. I lose self-control and little gets done when I’m absorbed in a gripping novel.

So, I opted for a movie and picked the shorter one. I was heartened to see that the coming attractions, which had started playing immediately, were for movies I wouldn’t mind watching. It’s usually a good indication that the movie will be the same sort of film as the coming attractions it’s paired with.

David has a penchant for dark dramas and bizarre, excruciatingly slow-moving foreign films. He often chooses really good movies, but just as often after watching one of his choices, I am apt to think, boy, that was not a good use of my time. The movie I selected, Cheri, based on the book by Colette, was another in the long list of David movies that fell into the “not a good use of my time” category.

Of course, watching the romantic comedies I favor isn’t exactly good use of time either, but I’m a firm believer that laughter is the best medicine…and that misery loves company.

Thanks for listening.

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