2009.10.27 Plans for the weekend need some revision

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

Late on a Thursday night earlier this month, I emailed all my kids at once. The subject line was “weekend.”

“What's going on, boy and girls?” I asked.

Rozee emailed back early the next morning, also sending her response to Ben and Maddie.

“Tonight some friends are coming over for dinner because we got a bunch of southern stuff in our produce box this week like okra, black eyed peas, and pork chops.

“Tomorrow there is an Oktober Fest parade...then a counselor at Taylor's school is having a BBQ at his house in Luling, then we're going to the Avett Brothers concert in Baton Rouge.

“Sunday we're going to the Saints game.”

The “produce box” Rozee mentioned is similar to the CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) box David and I have signed up for these past two summers. We pay a lump sum in advance and receive a box of local organically grown vegetables every week of the growing season. Rozee and her husband Taylor pay by the week and receive a box of a wide variety of fruit and vegetables and even, apparently, pork chops.

Rozee lives in New Orleans where there’s always a lot going on, especially parades, concerts and Saints games. She and Taylor, an avid sports fan, have season tickets and they routinely take advantage of all the culture New Orleans has to offer.

Ben responded later that afternoon. He and his wife Sarah live in Miami and also have action-packed lives, but apparently not much was going on that particular weekend. He started out telling what he and Sarah were planning to do, but not to be outdone by Rozee’s agenda, he “embellished.”

“Going to watch MSU football game with Sarah Hoadley, read the Bible, listen to classical music, walk shelter dogs and cats, run in a Relay for Life, volunteer teaching blind monkeys to paint, attend an idiot savant conference (the smart ones), help kids build sand castles at the beach, practice the ukulele and maybe go to Home Depot if I have time.”

I laughed and laughed.

Maddie, swamped with papers, tests, and all the other demands on a college kid, responded to the emails with one word:

“Boring.”

I emailed her back. “Maddie, are you saying ‘boring’ to both Ben and Rozee or are you saying your weekend will be boring?”

“All of those,” she responded.

If this email exchange indicates anything—besides Ben needling Rozee and Maddie being overwhelmed by schoolwork—it’s the utter lack of any mention of the kinds of things I might have said if they had turned the question on me.

Do laundry, wash dishes, get the bathroom ready for wallpapering, clean the kitchen...

I might not have done any of those things, but that’s probably what I would have been talking about.

I need to get in a whole new frame of mind—maybe take a page from the book, “Half Broke Horses,” by Jeannette Walls, author of “The Glass Castle.”

“Half Broke Horses: a true-life novel,” is the story of Jeannette’s extraordinary grandmother, Lily Casey Smith, who taught school, broke horses, flew airplanes, ran a ranch with her husband, and did all manner of things most women weren’t doing in her lifetime.

Lily had a real practical, some might say shocking, philosophy when it came to household tasks.

“As for clothes, I flatly refused to wash them....We wore our shirts till they got dirty, then we put them on backward and wore them until that side got dirty, then we wore them inside out, then inside out backward.”

When they got so dirty that her husband joked they were scaring the cattle, she’d take them into town and have them steam-cleaned.

She approached cooking in the same no-nonsense way: “I made food. Beans were my speciality....My recipe was fairly simple: Boil beans, salt to taste.” Steak? “Fry on both sides, salt to taste.” Potatoes? “Boil unpeeled, salt to taste.”

I’m thinking I need to adopt Lily’s way of life. I’d definitely have a lot more time to do things like teach blind monkeys to paint.

  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016